My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Tuesday—Sunday morning I arrived in New York City and I can't say that snow in the streets when it gets as dirty as it is at present has much charm. In Endicott, N.Y. it was beautiful and at the International Business Machine Company Homestead the grounds around were constantly alive with young people tobogganing or coasting or skiing. My own little backyard in New York City is still fairly clean and the dogs seem to enjoy the snow. They arrived from the country soon after I reached my apartment.

This last 10 days of lecturing has been an easy and pleasant experience. Many of the lectures were in the state of Ohio. Three of them were at Ohio universities, Kent, Miami, and Ohio Wesleyan. I particularly like the opportunity to go to the universities because there is always free time when the young people can ask questions in an informal atmosphere. This is stimulating, I think, for the person being questioned, as well as for the questioners.

I felt in Ohio a great interest in seeing the countryside. Part of the time I was in an industrial area, but as I travelled by day a good deal I saw quite a little of the country. We are a very fortunate and prosperous country and this state is one of the states that has many resources and has developed them well. It has had a great many fine men who have participated in local, state and national politics. Like every other state they have been of varying political parties and some might be called conservative and some liberals but the state and the people have prospered, probably just because of this variety in their leadership.

There was a remarkable article in the Sunday magazine this week telling the story of Senator Robert Taft's last weeks. He faced death gallantly, and the way he rallied to greet his wife when she visited him in the hospital showed what love and strength of purpose can accomplish. To meet this emergency and leave with his wife a picture that he wanted her to retain in her memory, he could pull himself back even from the edge of coma.

Somehow one can never be sorry for the people who leave this world. It is always those who remain that one feels need understanding and sympathy. In reading this article, I feel the heart of the women of the country will go out to Mrs. Taft.

Monday I went back to work and made a little talk to a group in the United Nations in the early afternoon. I had a buffet luncheon with a small group to discuss the National Issues Committee and spent the afternoon in the office at the American Association for the U.N.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL