My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

Text Size: Small Text Normal Text Large Text Larger Text

NEW YORK, Monday—On the opening night we went to see Katherine Cornell in "The Prescott Proposals," by Lindsay and Crouse. Everybody had told me, of course, that since I was the only woman delegate who had served from the beginning of the General Assembly the writers must have had me in mind in writing Miss Cornell's part. I feel quite sure that such a thought never crossed their minds and I only wish I could have been half as effective or half as attractive as is Mary Prescott when acted by Miss Cornell. Neither did anything as exciting as the story of this play ever happen in all the years I served on the United Nations.

It is a good play I think and the authors get in some very useful information about the U.N. and actually, through the portrayal of the characters, I think they will get considerable understanding over to people about the U.N., so from my point of view it is a useful play.

People go to the theatre largely to be entertained, however, and I can only say that all those who were with me were both interested and entertained. You could criticize little points here and here, but as an evening's entertainment I think people will find that it is good. I hope it will run for many months because of the information it does impart in such sugar-coated fashion.

The casting is remarkable. I enjoyed the Russian delegate and I admired the Pakistani delegate and I was glad that, in rather exaggerated form, the sensitiveness of people from that area of the world was brought out so clearly. We cannot be too careful lest we offend in minor ways and thereby hurt the deeper understanding and goodwill that we strive for.

At noon on Thursday of the past week I attended the Advertising Women's luncheon. General Romulo and I decided that we were always too prompt. He had been told to arrive at 12:00 and he was on the minute. I had been told to arrive at 12:00 also but I delayed it and only arrived at 12:15. We did not, however, sit down to luncheon until 1:00, so I decided it would be a good idea not to be so prompt in the future.

Luncheon, however, was perfectly delightful. Both the Ambassador from Korea and General Romulo made delightful speeches. Everyone spoke briefly and I felt that it was one of the few occasions when one did not mind being held a little beyond the 2:30 time that many of us had set for departure.

Mrs. Dorothy Lewis of the U.N. presided and made us all feel that we were making a real contribution no matter how short our speeches were or how little they really contained of importance.

One thing I think everyone felt was that the purpose of the luncheon was worthwhile. The advertising women are pledged to support 15 Korean children and this luncheon was given to aid that endeavor. It gave us all a chance to say Merry Christmas to each other and hope that some children far away would be happier in their lives.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL