My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Wednesday—I flew to Pittsburgh the other evening. The trip turned out to be rather long and we were half an hour late in landing which meant that it was 10:30 p.m. By the time we reached the home of my host, Mr. Filipkowski, in Erie it was around 2:30 a.m. However, his wife and even some of the children were waiting to greet us with a blazing fire on an ample hearth and hot cocoa for everyone.

The next morning started bright and early with a newspaper reporter for breakfast at 8:30! I drove around to see our host's land and business projects and then visited his daughter's school, Mercyhurst Seminary. This school consists of high school and college. The college students are residents, the high school students come by the day. It is a delightful campus with charming buildings, a theatre, and a library which, I am sure, create an atmosphere where young people love to work. The Sisters all seemed interested and very kind to their young pupils.

In the afternoon I had a television interview with Mr. Lamb before which he told me that he was taking my son, Franklin, to the Gridiron dinner in Rochester, N.Y., in his plane and that he hoped the young man would someday be President. I responded by saying that we were rather far away from any such possibility, but I felt Franklin's years in Congress had been of value to him and that he had matured and gained in ability to do good service in his chosen career.

To my surprise the paper next day carried the statement that I advocated my son as President. So easily can one be misunderstood, but I imagine Mr. Lamb's enthusiasm carried him away and he was anxious to have me join in his own forecast for the future.

That evening Mr. and Mrs. Filipkowski had a wonderful dinner in their new room which they hope to see used in the future by many gatherings of civic and social groups in the area.

They are certainly enterprising business people and I never saw a young family cooperate better, so I hope they will have success in all their plans for the future. Their dinner and the reception for me was attended by many people and I was happy to have an opportunity to meet so many of the citizens of Erie and to talk to them about the United Nations and particularly about the American Association for the U.N..

In the afternoon I met with a group of women who are anxious to form an Erie chapter of the American Association.

On Sunday morning a group of about 12 members of the Americans for Democratic Action came to breakfast at 9:00 o'clock, with the result that I was too late to get to the service at the Episcopal Church which I had hoped to attend.

In any case the rain was so heavy that I decided we should start for Buffalo rather earlier than had been planned. We reached Buffalo in ample time for me to attend a reception and speak at the dinner of the Jewish War Veterans who were celebrating their 25th anniversary.

I caught the 10:15 p.m. plane for N.Y. and though we had a rough trip we arrived only half an hour late.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL