My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Friday—It was a most interesting morning that General Willis D. Crittenberger and Mrs. Joseph P. Lash of the Citizens Committee on Children of New York City arranged on Tuesday for the Queen of Greece. I found myself visiting many of the things I had already visited but finding them as interesting as before. I was able to appreciate improvements that had been made since my previous visit.

First the Queen went to the rehabilitation center, which Dr. Howard A. Rusk heads, on First Avenue and saw the work done for children and adults. This was of great interest to Her Majesty because of the many children in Greece who have been injured and maimed and need rehabilitation work, both physical and psychiatric.

Her Majesty is simply remarkable with children. She has patience and tact, never approaches them in a way to frighten them as so many people do. Instinctively she seems to know that children are frightened by noise and this is particularly the case with disturbed children. She is also most careful to notice every child and she even went back into one room when she realized she had forgotten to speak to a child who was at the other end of the room.

After the rehabilitation center, we visited Henry Street Settlement and as we climbed the stairs in these various buildings, Mrs. Lash remarked: "Queens and President's wives should always be chosen for their ability to walk indefinitely and never become tired. The Queen of Greece seems to do it with such ease!"

The Queen enjoyed the neighborhood house and Miss Helen Hall's explanations of the various activities. Her Lady-in-waiting told me that she was starting in Greece a Junior League with somewhat the ideas Mary Harriman had years ago when she started the Junior League in this country. There are only a few of us left to remember that we who went without any training in those days probably learned more than we taught in some of our undertakings. I am sure that this is what will happen with the young people of Greece in the League which the Queen hopes to start.

From Henry Street we went to the Alfred E. Smith houses. We saw Hamilton House Settlement which is incorporated with the houses and runs its activities largely for the people of that neighborhood. The Queen visited an apartment belonging to a young couple whose father and mother had come here from Greece and needless to say it was a great event for them.

Everywhere the Queen was greeted with warmth and her own warm personality called out a smiling and warm reply from every group which she passed.

It was a rewarding morning just to watch how people respond to genuine interest and I was happy to have had the opportunity of going with the Queen and saying goodbye to her after a morning which I am sure meant real genuine satisfaction to her. General Crittenberger must have felt rewarded in having helped the Queen to see some of the things she wanted to see in this country.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL