My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Wednesday—In San Francisco I had the pleasure of seeing another of my nieces and her husband, Mr. and Mrs. Agar Jaicks, and when I went to do a television show I was amused to find that the man in charge of the floor was this nephew. They followed around to all the meetings one evening and then came to breakfast with me the next morning. So on this trip I have seen three nieces, one in Denver, one in Seattle, and one in San Francisco.

Friday morning there was another meeting of organizations cooperating with the American Association for the United Nations, and we did a short recording on the platform during which questions were asked me by various people and these questions and answers will be on the air during the program on world affairs which is done here, I believe, every Sunday morning.

Our next stop on leaving San Francisco was Santa Barbara. They began to worry as to weather conditions and these conditions changed so fast that I was not surprised that they were somewhat concerned but we had to just pray that we could keep to our schedule because we could not manage it unless we could fly. I looked anxiously out the window that morning and saw a clear sky but during the morning it began to cloud up, not sufficiently, however, to keep us from getting through. We ate our lunch in the airport and had a meeting in Santa Barbara where both Mr. Eichelberger and I spoke and there was a period of questions. Then I presented two prizes to essay contest winners who had written about the United Nations.

My son Elliott was on hand before we finished to drive us to Los Angeles. There my daughter Anna had planned a very simple supper between half past eight and nine so that the family could get together and Mr. Eichelberger and Miss Baillargeon could tell Anna something about her old friends in Seattle.

Saturday was a carefully planned day by the Los Angeles chapter and we started by going down to Long Beach, leaving the hotel at nine a.m., which meant I left my son's house shortly after eight a.m. Ranch life seems to have him accustomed to getting up early in the morning and nobody murmured that we were getting up at rather an early hour.

On Sunday morning I left for Tucson and spoke there in the evening at the Tucson Sunday Forum and attended a reception given by the Young Democrats after the meeting. My old friend Mrs. Greenway's son, Jack Greenway, seems to be the moving spirit. I had not seen him in a long while and I was interested to find that he lives in Tucson.

The next morning, Monday, I took an early plane for Albuquerque, changing planes in Phoenix. There I arrived in time for a luncheon and many more activities that lasted through the afternoon and evening but ended in time for me to take a one a.m. plane for New York City and home.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL