My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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SEATTLE, Friday—The northwest region has had people at our American Association for the United Nations organization meeting from Canada, from Montana, Oregon, and Idaho. Everyone at the luncheon came representing cooperating organizations, so it was not just the American Association for the United Nations but the League of Women Voters and the churches and the lawyers and the university and endless others that were putting themselves to work to obtain the objectives set by the AAUN.

This is a fortunate area because in spite of some antagonism they have been able to carry on a remarkable program in the schools and they had a great deal of cooperation. The AAUN chapter for the northwest has maintained an office and has been fortunate in having Mrs. Walter Price who has a dynamic personality to sparkplug the work. The only television station in Seattle as yet is KING and Mr. Bullitt, who is the owner of the station, is particularly interested in the use of television for educational purposes.

They have a half hour every morning devoted to education and one day this week they devoted that time to telling the people of Seattle what activities are carried on for this area by the American Association for the United Nations. The president of the Northwest Chapter, Mr. Horowitz, and I were first on the screen with a group of little eight-year-olds and their teacher. They were all born the day the United Nations was born so they have celebrated on October 24th ever since, and been a part of the United Nations Day celebration in Seattle. Each of them has a birthday cake on the 24th and they saved one of the cakes for me, put it in the deep freeze and brought it out this week. I suggested that at the end of the show we cut it and all of us have a piece and that idea seemed to meet with their approval.

Next on the screen Mr. Horowitz took me to the high school students with their teacher. This young boy and girl told me of their participation in the AAUN essay contest, and how once a week they went to meetings to listen to people tell them about the United Nations and to report back to their respective schools on what they have learned. They told me also about the foreign students and about hearing from these students and what the United Nations meant to them.

Then I went on to the college students and after they had asked me two questions a little film was shown of one of them at the dedication of the United Nations fountain which was the gift of the school children of the United States. Next I talked to three young married women belonging to the AAUN who are receiving once a month the Peoples Section from the AAUN and using it as a discussion guide and sending in their resolutions to the American Association for the United Nations.

At the end I had the pleasure of meeting young Ensign Nixon the jet pilot who was shot down in North Korean waters. His plane exploded and he was thought to be lost but he was rescued by the North Koreans and was one of the first exchanges to come across the border. He spoke on how the men felt about the United Nations and their hope that it would be strengthened by the work of every citizen.

This all took only a half hour but November 11th being a holiday it reached over television many thousands of people and I think that its program might be copied in many other communities.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL