My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Wednesday—Last Monday afternoon I left by train for Easton, Pa., where I had promised to speak at an evening meeting. Then after spending the night there I left Tuesday morning by plane for Cleveland where again I had to speak on television in the late afternoon and at a meeting in the evening. Fortunately for me, I was able to get a plane home Tuesday evening because I really like to get as much time at home as I can even during a period in which I am doing as much speaking as I possibly can for the American Association for the United Nations.

I was very much interested on Monday in a column written from Formosa by Joseph Alsop. It cleared up some of the illusions I have felt were being created, probably with only a slim amount of foundation under them. And it also gave the facts which seemed to me extremely good and worthy of great satisfaction.

Even if the Formosa government is not a complete democracy, to have an honest government is a tremendous step forward. The Chinese people have never had honesty in government before and what liberty does exist is undoubtedly a very pleasant change, for too much liberty has never existed in the Far East for the people. I thought Mr. Alsop's article, stating conditions as they really are, was extremely interesting. All those connected with this achievement in Formosa should be heartened and proud to have brought about such a change.

I am always saddened when I hear or read about a milk strike. The real sufferers always are the babies, the old people and the sick. As you all know, this week we have had a milk strike in the metropolitan New York area.

While this strike was going on in New York, Washington was having an invasion of cattlemen from the West and South, seeking to talk to Secretary of Agriculture Ezra Taft Benson. At first the Secretary said he would not see them, but later changed his plans and met with them. Several conferences were held, but the picture still looks dark for the cattlemen so far as direct Federal price supports are concerned.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL