My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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CHICAGO, Sunday—It was good news to hear the other day that the U.N. Children's Emergency Fund has decided to change its name to the U.N. Children's Fund, although retaining the symbol UNICEF because that has become so well known. The resolution making this change goes on to request the Secretary General "to insure that the programs carried on by UNICEF continue to be coordinated effectively with the regular and technical assistance programs of the U.N. and the specialized agencies."

Three years ago the United States asked that this change in name be made. It also requested that the program, while employing supplies, should lay more emphasis, in those areas where needed, on projects to increase the food supplies required by children; that it should coordinate this program with other specialized agencies and technical assistance programs; and should ask that the administrative expenses be borne by all the nations simply by placing the Children's Emergency Fund under the Secretary General for this purpose. When I look back to the stand then taken against this position, I realize that everything the U.S. advocated has now been accomplished, except the last item. This will probably be accomplished in the near future.

In view of the changes which have been made, I sincerely hope that Congress's objections to the fund, having been almost entirely met, will be removed and that there will be no question about the U.S. government appropriating substantial sums in the future for the welfare of the children of the world. I think, too, we have proved to the nations that were so suspicious of the U.S. in the past that we are interested in helping children in any part of the world regardless of color or race, and also that we were being practical and accepting the statement made by the food and agriculture and specialized agencies that supplies alone were not sufficient in the world to meet the needs of the children. If all the powdered milk in the world were gathered together, only half a cup of milk a day could be given to every hungry child. Therefore it was quite evident that the ability to produce the food required must be increased in all the areas of the world where there were undernourished children.

This is well under way now, but we must see to it that it goes forward. Herds of cattle must be improved to give more milk, soil conservation must be practiced, and we must make sure that nations do not so misuse their soil that neither cattle nor people get much good from what is grown in their country. UNICEF appeals to the hearts of men, but it should lead to some very practical considerations and programs.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL