My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Friday—It has been a busy week.

After dinner Sunday night, we drove two hours, part of it through driving rain, and I admired our young chauffeur's ability not only to keep the road but to maintain his speed. We reached Mexico, where we were to board the train, ahead of schedule. The word to watch for me had gone ahead and I was at once greeted by a very nice young Hawaiian on the local paper. When he was finished there was a gentleman with a recording machine from the local radio station also wanting me to answer questions. Then I got on the train and I was on my way to Des Moines, Iowa.

Tuesday morning we were met at eight o'clock in Des Moines by Mr. and Mrs. David Kruidenier, Jr. Mr. Eichelberger, who had left us for a side trip to Bloomington, Ill, joined us again in Des Moines. After breakfast there was a long press conference and there were recordings, and then I wrote my column. Right in the middle I did a television recording for Iowa State College and then we went to a luncheon given by the Junior Chamber of Commerce which was being held on the subject of Human Rights.

They are having a week of talks and events of this kind to discuss Human Rights in Des Moines and the meeting of the Junior Chamber of Commerce seemed well attended. After my talk and a period of questions, we adjourned at two o'clock and Mr. Eichelberger and I went at once with Mrs. Kruidenier, our state chairman for Iowa, for a meeting of her committee, attended by people throughout the state working for the American Association for the United Nations. That lasted until four o'clock and was a very good meeting at which the possibility for cooperation with other organizations and the means for getting out information were widely discussed. Questions brought out many phases of the problems and I hope that we were able to be of help and that it will begin to show in better organization in this state.

Then we returned to Mrs. Kruidenier's house for a tea and in the evening there was a public meeting at which I talked on the United Nations and Human Rights. At the end of this meeting we went to the train, but our night was not a long one for we got off at Englewood, Ill. at 6:50 a.m. and were driven to the Chicago airport where we got an 8:30 plane to Pittsburgh.

The day in Pittsburgh, as days in this trip have gone, seemed comparatively leisurely. There was a press conference during the afternoon and a big meeting in the evening, but I slept in a bed for a change and on Wednesday morning I went only to one meeting and a luncheon before leaving for State College, Pa., at one o'clock. One more big meeting there in the evening and then the night train from Altoona to New York, and Thursday morning found me back in New York City.

Our first organizing trip is at an end, and I have come back much encouraged. We will not know until we make our next round of visits in the spring, how much each state organization has been able to do in working through local chapters and getting out information and in promoting cooperation with other organizations. When I am told, however, that the United Nations is of no interest to the people of the United States I can smile now with some confidence, remembering how many people came to hear about the United Nations, and how many people stayed to ask questions, and how many people came to small meetings for organization purposes.

I am sure now from personal experience that the Gallup polls are right and that the majority of this nation believes that the United Nations is our best instrument and our main hope for establishing greater understanding among the peoples of the world, which is the one way to promote world peace.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL