My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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PITTSBURGH, Wednesday—The trip to Culver-Stockton College at Canton, Mo., was safely made though it was rather a foggy flight. And when we came through the clouds we were quite near the ground. There I was met by President and Mrs. Ziegler and their son and they drove me over to the college campus where I was taken over by a group of student officers who showed me the campus. They have a girls' dormitory and a boys' dormitory, a lovely library and an administration building, a gymnasium and class room building. Chi Omega has a very fine sorority building and there is one other similar building which is a fraternity house and they have some in the town.

The president's house is also in the little town of Canton but there are some houses up on the hill where the college buildings are, and they have a beautiful view. In fact in some places you can see the Mississippi River. The college owns a good deal of land, so at the very top of the campus they have a fine golf course. Their college was established 100 years ago and they are celebrating this fact. They are also very proud of the fact that they were the first coeducational college established in this whole area.

After my trip with the young people I had about a half hour in which I occupied the housemother's rooms in the girls' dormitory, and then a buzzing of voices warned me that the college was gathering outside for lunch and I had better appear. I did so and found a number of guests had arrived from a neighboring college. These are religious colleges established by the Christian Church, but like so many church colleges, once they have been established the church feels that they should run on their own resources and this is not always practical. I gathered that they were having some difficulty in meeting the rising costs which are bedeviling many colleges at this time. I sometimes wonder the churches feel it worthwhile to establish these colleges if they do not feel it important to help them develop the best possible processes of education, and this of course requires money. Culver-Stockton College concentrates on a liberal arts course and does prepare for engineering, divinity school, and medical school as well as teaching.

After lunch we all went to the gymnasium where my speech on the United Nations was made, and though the audience consisted of well over 1,000 people, and the seats in the balcony were filled to the limit, we still were able to have a question period, and I think as I have said before that the interest in the United Nations far surpasses what I had dared to hope in this midwest area. Of course the St. Louis Post Dispatch supports the United Nations and is widely read throughout Missouri, and that is a great help.

After the speech a coffee hour was held at which I shook hands for an hour with guests who had come for the occasion from many small towns and villages. Then my kind hosts took me to dinner in a place where you saw ham being barbecued, turning round and round on a spit, and of course we had barbecued ham with a delightful sauce. Whatever I do is not only flavored with barbecued ham but with a considerable signing of my book, "India and the Awakening East," and of autographs. This was so both at the coffee hour and in the restaurant.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL