My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

Text Size: Small Text Normal Text Large Text Larger Text

ATLANTA, Wednesday—In Nashville on Tuesday, we held a morning meeting primarily for the members of the United Nations Association chapters in the area. But some people came from Mississippi and Alabama who were officers of the Parent-Teachers Association. In those states, we have no state chairmen yet. We are very glad of this contact and hope out of it may grow the possibility of getting those states to organize work with the AAUN.

Nashville itself as a city seems to have been quite active. Its education committee has done a good deal of work in the schools, and encouraged young people to join in the essay contest and study groups, in fact, they have even succeeded in getting a mention on their report cards of their study of the United Nations. They raised enough money here last year to send one of the high school winners on a visit to the United Nations and he came home so enthusiastic that one lady said he spoke like a seasoned speaker for a full hour before the filled auditorium of his high school.

After the morning meeting, at which there was a good deal of discussion about what we can do to improve the enthusiasm and get wider distribution of information, I went to speak at the Rotary Club. The Rotary Club has a representative at the United Nations, so they have a good deal of information on the activities of the General Assembly and other group meetings. The last time I had spoken before a Rotary Club audience was in Japan. The gentleman who introduced me here spoke of their last convention in Paris where 63 nations had been represented, which meant they had three more nations represented than could be counted in the United Nations and, of course, Japan was one of them.

In the afternoon, at a meeting to which other organizations besides the United Nations Association groups were invited, we continued the morning discussion. Mr. Eichelberger, Miss Linzer and I had an early dinner with Mr. Maclin Davis, who is Tennessee chairman for the American Association for the United Nations. His interest in international affairs is almost a tradition, for I can remember how his father, Norman Davis, worked for the League of Nations and attended innumerable conferences on disarmament.

The evening meeting met in the War Memorial, which is a beautiful building, at 7:30 and was open to the general public. We left by the 9:52 plane for Atlanta and we are starting a day here which promises to be a very busy one, but I will have to tell you about that tomorrow.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL