My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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RICHMOND, Va., Friday—After our regional meeting in New York, I took the plane to Washington to attend the dinner of the Women's National Press Club where I was to speak on my last trip abroad. I was delighted to be met at the airport by my friend, Mrs. James Hendrick. Her husband has gone out to Korea with Mr. Tyler Wood to help with rehabilitation and I have missed seeing them for a long time, since they were in Thailand before for several months. I do not know whether Mrs. Hendrick is going to join her husband, but I feel quite sure if he stays very long she will be flying out to try to make a home in Korea.

Mrs. Hendrick dropped me at my old friend, Mrs. Adolph Miller's home, where I just had time to greet my hostess before dressing for dinner.

The next day I had the great pleasure of lunching with the Indian Ambassador and Mrs. Mehta, of seeing a number of people during the day and of dining in the evening with the Washington American Veterans Committee and speaking at their meeting.

Early this morning I took the plane for Richmond and since Washington is on daylight saving time and Richmond on standard time, I arrived five minutes before I left which is a really very delightful experience! It adds a whole hour to the day!

This is our second regional meeting and I hope it is going to be even more successful than the one in New York.

The other day I received a letter from Mr. Lawrence S. Mayers who told me that early this year he had spent several weeks in India and I would like to quote to you something which he says about his impressions:

"While visiting the schools and colleges here (India), I talked to many students and teachers. These meetings impressed me for two reasons:

"(1) the deep-rooted misgivings which the people of India had about Americans, based on color, (2) the conflict between the U.S. and U.S.S.R. was considered a diplomatic encounter between two opposing powers. The U.S. was not considered better or worse than the U.S.S.R. and the contrast between their national ideals, methods, philosophy of government was hardly mentioned."

He came home and decided to do something about this. He sponsored an essay contest for Indian students on the subject "What Can I Do To Contribute To A Permanent State of Peace In The World?" The best essay was written by Mr. M.T.D. Ananta, and if you write to L. & C. Mayers Co., in New York, I think they will send you the little leaflet in which they have published this essay. It is well worth reading by anyone and I think Mr. Mayers is to be congratulated for having initiated this activity as a private American citizen.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL