My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK. Thursday—The drive to Avon, Conn., from Hyde Park the other day was really beautiful. While the color in the woods is not yet very evident, there are trees here and there which have changed and you see the beginnings of a glorious autumn season. I have been a little afraid that the dry weather would bring the leaves down without allowing them to really turn, but that fear seems to have been unfounded.

I stopped to see my cousin, Mrs. Alsop, but she had not yet returned from a weekend away.

The flight from Hartford to New York was very pleasant because Miss Harrison, who runs the Service Bureau which Mrs. Auerbach of Fox Department Stores in Hartford sponsors, was with me on the trip, and Mrs. Auerbach took us to the plane and saw us off.

We talked a little of the plans which the Service Bureau is making for this coming year and Miss Harrison agreed with me that women are becoming constantly more interested in world affairs.

In the evening at the Waldorf the American Association for the United Nations held its dinner for the Secretary–General of the U.N., Mr. Dag Hammarskjold. I thought everyone there seemed happy and interested and I was glad to see a number of people whom I had not seen for some time. Mr. Walter Williams, who is a member of the Board of the Association and also a part of the official family of the present Administration, read a very fine message from President Eisenhower. The Canadian Ambassador read a message from Mr. Pearson, the President of the outgoing Assembly, who could not be present because of a conflicting engagement.

Everyone wanted to do honor to the Secretary General. He is such a friendly person, so easy to talk to and so out-going, ready to come more than half-way himself. His own speech was, I thought, a very scholarly and interesting one.

He told me he had written it at a cabin he has up in the Fishkill mountains. He added that he found it easier to write anything which he really had to think about when he was away from his pressing duties in the U.N. and could sit in his cabin at leisure.

I had my first guests for lunch and dinner in my new apartment in New York this week and I have decided there really are advantages in home cooking and your own environment. When I finally get curtains up and all the pictures hung, I shall begin to feel really settled.

A project which I think sounds really exciting was brought to my attention last week. Those of you who attended the 1951 Herald Tribune Forum probably know all about it, but I have only just discovered it. It came to me in a booklet published by the Herald Tribune called "Trading Home Towns" and was sent to me by Mrs. Helen Waller who originated the idea. It tells the story of an exchange between Etawah, India, and Caroll County, Georgia, and I advise you to read it because you may well want to repeat this experiment in your own community.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL