My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK,Tuesday—We went down to lunch Saturday with Mr. and Mrs. Henry Morgenthau, Jr., and saw his orchards simply laden with fruit, and the most beautiful fruit you ever saw. Apple orchards are really delightful, nothing is more beautiful than blossom time in the spring and then again in the autumn. The red and gold and green of the apples make a most wonderful landscape.

In the evening we all dined with my cousin, Miss Laura Delano, and then three of us went to the last concert of the summer held under the auspices of the Hudson Valley Chamber Music Circle in the old Mills House which is now the Mills Memorial State Park. The WOR String Quartet played and those of you who listen to them over the air know how beautifully they play together. They were joined by Miss Elizabeth Katzenellenbogen, the head of the music department at Vassar College, who was the solo pianist. These concerts were started as an experiment, but they are so well attended now that I am sure they are far beyond the experimental stage. I missed the first two while I was abroad but was glad to get to the last one.

When we came out it was already after 11 p.m and we found ourselves in the midst of an electrical storm and a downpour of rain. I ran to my car, which luckily was not far away, and we drove home through the storm to find that everyone was very worried about us. Just what they thought would happen I do not know but we arrived quite safely and that ended a busy day.

Sunday, the three young men and one young lady who are over here from Great Britain on the Roosevelt-Nottingham Scholarships came up to spend the day. They went over to the old house and library on arrival and after lunch I picked them up and brought them home for a picnic lunch. In the afternoon they played tennis and we had an early supper before they all went back to the city to start off on Monday their serious labors. Several of them are interested in different phases of the textile industry but all of them want to travel as much as they can through this country.

Occasionally a little incident reminds me that this is a very small world. Yesterday, I got a letter from a nun, Madre Francesca Chiara, M.A.SS.J., who signs herself underneath (The World, Edith V. Cowles of Farmington, Connecticut, U.S.A.). She speaks of my uncle, Admiral William Cowles who was a first cousin of her father's and mentions the house in Farmington which was near her father's house.

All this by the way of introduction to a plea for another nun who is working with children in Calabria, Italy. The bishop of Reggio, Calabria, called Sister Raffaella Gioletta to this work, but the poverty is so great that they are in desperate need of clothes and food. She says that United Nations International Children's Emergency Fund sent them some powdered milk last year but no other aid has come since then. Even medicines and medical help of all kinds is lacking both for these children and the adults in that region.

There must be Italians in this country who know that area of Italy and perhaps could send to the Bishop there some of the things that are needed for the children. I hope if they read this they will feel moved to answer this appeal.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL