My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Monday—An interesting little bit of history was written me the other day. It told me of a little church known as Midway Church which was founded in Liberty County, Georgia, 40 miles south of Savannah, in 1754. My correspondent says, "The founders were a group of Puritans, descendants of those Puritans who had settled in and founded a church at Dorchester, Massachusetts, in 1630. The first settlement of those who left Massachusetts for the south was in South Carolina in 1695. They finally abandoned that colony in 1754 and settled in Liberty County, Georgia, which was then, I think, known as St. John's Parish.

"One of the towns they founded there was also named Dorchester, but it has long since depreciated into practically nothing but a name on maps. Descendants of the colony are now scattered all over America but many still live in Liberty County (so called since the days of the Revolution)."

Mr. Richard Le Conte Anderson, who writes me, tells me that in the little cemetery some of my ancestors are buried. Services are no longer conducted regularly in Midway Church, but in the spring an anniversary service is usually held when as many of the old members and their descendants as can do so try to attend.

The history of this church and biographical sketches which were included with the history were written and published by the Rev. James Stacy in 1894. He was a descendant of those originally interested. It became more and more difficult to get this book and so it has now been republished by Mr. Luther Quarterman of Flemington, Georgia, an officer of the Midway Society. He did this work in collaboration with the late Mr. Albert L. Baker of New York City, who was also a descendant and one of the Midway members.

The new publication carries the records of marriages, baptisms, and deaths and other material which was not included in the original work and additional historical notes written by Mrs. Elizabeth Walker Quarterman, wife of one of the publishers of this new volume. The colored prints which are an improvement in the new volume are made by Miss Leonora Quarterman who was an artist and who did them by the silk screen process. I am delighted to have this book which mentions many of the Bulloch family ancestors and their relatives and I hope that by writing about it some of the other descendants of the original members may learn about it and be interested in obtaining the book. It costs $10 and can be obtained from Mr. Luther H. Quarterman, Flemington, Georgia. I think this is a book which will be of interest also to many English people who will find in their country some of the ancestors of those who are mentioned here.

This has been a warm weekend but very pleasant here in the country. We played tennis and the Roosevelt Home Club had its picnic on our grounds on Saturday afternoon, and Sunday many members of the staff of the American Association for the United Nations came up for a visit to the library and a picnic lunch. Otherwise, we have been quiet and enjoyed the numerous children and felt sad that on Wednesday of this week, Mrs. Elliott and her four children will leave us and I think all their cousins here are going to be very lonely.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL