My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Sunday—My days in New York are becoming more and more crowded.

I did a recording on Thursday with Bill Leonard of CBS. In the afternoon and evening I saw two movies which were submitted by Great Britain and France for consideration in the competition for an award which chooses the best movie on the basis of what will convey most clearly some phase of the ideals by which we live.

We got up early Friday morning so as to be back in Hyde Park in time to open the three-day art exhibit at the village library. I could hardly believe that this was the same art exhibit I had visited last year. The number of contributors has grown greatly since then, and I think the quality of the painting has greatly improved. Some of the painters are amateurs. One boy of 15 contributed two pictures this year that I liked very much. Columbia County sent down quite a collection of pictures, and painters seem to be developing all over Dutchess County.

To one who loves the Hudson River and Dutchess County, it is always very difficult not to want to buy some of the watercolors. But I have so many pictures now that it is hard to find space on the walls for them. I know, however, that in the course of the next few days I shall probably go back and be lured into buying something.

We have not only painters in Hyde Park Village, but a number of craftsmen. Otto Berge, of course, has been building fine furniture for a long time. But there is another artist who makes very interesting furniture, and also a young man and his wife whose ceramics are very beautiful.

Friday afternoon my niece, Mrs. Elliott, and I went up to Tanglewood as Mrs. Auerbach's guests for the evening performance. I rarely manage to go more than once in the season because of the long drive. But I always wish that I went many times, for the music is beautiful and particularly refreshing in those surroundings. Before joining Mrs. Auerbach we stopped for a few minutes to see Mr. and Mrs. David Levy, who were staying in Lenox with Mrs. Levy's sister and brother-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Stern of New Orleans. I was particularly glad of this opportunity, for I had not seen Mr. and Mrs. Stern since they were my kind and thoughtful hosts last year in New Orleans.

On Saturday afternoon we celebrated two birthdays among the young friends in the neighborhood. All the children joined in the party, the ages ranging from nearly one year to 14 years. One of my grandsons from California has joined the gang for a day or two before he starts on his first trip to Europe. With so many young people around, one never has a dull moment.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL