My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Wednesday—We left Hyde Park early Tuesday morning and I did a recording at 10:30 with Ben Grauer. At 12:00 I was over at the United Nations and did one recording in English and one in French on my world tour. I spent two hours in the American Association for the United Nations office in the afternoon and the trip which Mr. Eichelberger and I are going to take in order to hold regional meetings of our State Chairmen and Chapter heads throughout the eastern states was gone over carefully. The first meeting will be in New York City on September 23rd and then we will gradually progress through the eastern states.

There is a delicious little note in one of the evening papers that says the State Department has been worrying as to whether lady ambassadors should be addressed as "Madam" or "Madame." They had to check with Emily Post. I doubt if Mrs. Post had ever before been consulted on affairs of state, but her answer was that the proper title for a lady ambassador is "Madam Ambassador." So Mrs. Luce and the new ambassador to Switzerland now know how they should be addressed and so does the State Department, and this weighty matter can be set aside for less important things.

There is a very interesting report sent out by a news service of an interview with President Tito of Yugoslavia. It is interesting to note how consistent this man is! What he said in this interview, he said to Adlai Stevenson and he said the same to me. He wants normal relations with the Soviet Union and he wants the same kind of normal relations with all countries throughout the world. He wants Yugoslavia to retain its independence in everything and he does not intend to rejoin the Cominform. Certainly the Yugoslavs have been closer to the Soviet Union than any other country. They know the mentality of Russia and the mentality of the Russian leaders and when they speak about Russian affairs it is well to listen to them for I think they are apt to gauge fairly correctly the point of view of the people with whom they once worked so closely.

Those who are concerned about the work of Magistrates' courts in New York City, especially where this work touches youngsters, are awaiting with considerable anxiety to hear what Mayor Impellitteri is going to do about the reappointment of Judge Morris Ploscowe. His term ends on Saturday. He was appointed as an Independent Democrat by Mayor La Guardia. He is known not only in New York but all over the country for his wise use of the facilities available to the Magistrates' courts. He has been most instrumental in getting help through social work and health agencies for the poor and helpless people who come before him. He is a nationally known expert in the administration of criminal law.

Judge Ploscowe not only has the backing of the Bar Associations and social agencies all over the country, but a great number of newspapers of very different complexions have come out in favor of his reappointment. There seems to be some question, however, as to whether he actually has the kind of practical political support which is often found to be necessary. We hope very much that in this instance, the Mayor will be able to think of the judiciary as separated from the usual political scene. In that case, this jurist who has such a really fine record will certainly be reappointed.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL