My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Monday—Sunday was our first real summer day at Hyde Park and all our young people were out on the tennis court for the first time.

We had a buffet luncheon for Mr. and Mrs. Henry Morgenthau who came over to join Mr. Leo Mates, Yugoslavia's permanent delegate to the United Nations, and Mrs. Mates, who were spending the weekend with me.

A number of young people "dropped in," including William Donner Roosevelt and a friend, a student from Spain. Elliott Roosevelt Jr. came from Andover to spend a long weekend—or what is called a long weekend in Andover! Chandler Roosevelt came up from Newport where he finished a two-week refresher course for the Marine Corps. John and his wife and family were up in their house for the weekend and Trude and Joe Lash were in their house. So we all came together for luncheon, and when that happens only a buffet lunch is possible. We had much good talk and laughter.

On Saturday we took the young people, including my grandchildren, Jonathan Lash, Nicky Pratt, Grania Gurewitsch and her friend, Ann Carlton, to West Point. There was no parade because the grounds were too soggy from the recent rains. So, we went to the beautiful chapel, and Mr. Myers, the organist, who has been there 40 years, played some selections for us. The most impressive and unforgettable selection is the Alma Mater preceded by music that depicts a storm almost matches the sound of battle.

As we came out, Ambassador Mates said to me, "That was an unforgettable experience." I am deeply grateful for Mr. Myers' kindness.

We all had a picnic lunch with Colonel and Mrs. Frisbee in their little garden and together with Mrs. Frisbee's preparations and ours we really had a feast.

The boys chose to go to the baseball game afterward but the rest of us visited the mess hall and the kitchen.

In that mess hall 2,500 boys are fed within a half-hour sitting and, in addition, they frequently feed as many as 200 members of visiting athletic teams on weekends. I never saw such a clean kitchen, and the efficiency with which everything is prepared and put into the hot-plate servers to keep warm just took my breath away. All the 2,500 boys at the dining tables are served with a hot dinner three minutes after the first boy is seated.

Mrs. Lash asked the cook what happened with the leftovers. He seemed bewildered for a minute and then responded, "There are no left-overs."

Later in the afternoon we saw a most interesting movie which depicted life at the Academy from first arrival to date. Certainly, 99 percent of the cadets' time is devoted to work but they make the most of the one percent of play.

On the whole, this was a most enjoyable weekend.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL