My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Friday—On Friday, May 8, at the New York School of Social Work a tribute was paid to the memory of Dr. Eduard C. Lindeman, long an educator in this country, highly respected and admired by those who knew him. I wish I could have been present because I always had a great admiration for Dr. Lindeman.

He was born of Danish parents in St. Clair, Michigan, in 1885 and his early youth was spent as a farm laborer. Therefore, his formal higher education did not begin until he was over 21. He was most successful as a teacher and his interests were wide and varied.

He became a leader in many organizations and wrote fearlessly. His teaching and writing were appreciated in Europe and the West Indies and Central America as well as here at home. His influence was felt as far away as India where he went in 1949 as visiting professor to the University of Delhi.

The New York School of Social Work hopes to establish in his memory the Eduard C. Lindeman professorial chair. The purpose of this chair is to "preserve and forward his philosophy and values in social work, in education, and in the American scene." This is a living tribute that will help to keep the thought of him alive among us and I hope it will be very successful.

Now I want to tell you about something entirely different but which interests me very much.

The City of Louisville is celebrating its 175th anniversary and part of the celebration is to be a play with music, entitled "The Tall Kentuckian" by Barbara Anderson.

This play is to be presented at the Iroquois Amphitheatre from June 15 through July 5. Norman Dello Joio is the composer of the music, Norris Houghton is the director, and the sets and costumes are designed by Alvin Colt. The character of Abraham Lincoln will be played by Royal Dano, whom you may have seen in "The Red Badge of Courage." Mary Todd will be played by Louisa Horton, who is the great granddaughter of John C. Breckenridge.

The sponsor of this particular part of the celebration is University Festival Incorporated, and it is one of the features of Mayor Charles P. Farnsley's birthday program which, I think, should appeal to a great many people.

Louisville is a charming city and should attract visitors from all over the country for this occasion.

While the play will remind us of the past, it will emphasize the present in that it will show, through the past, how important it is to face the issues of the present. Its theme will remind us how important it is to have convictions, to take our stand, and, once having taken that stand, to hold to it courageously.

I wish I were going to be here in June instead of in faraway Japan, but I shall anxiously await news of this whole celebration.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL