My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Sunday—On Friday night in New York City there was a send-off meeting to inaugurate the new organization of the American Association for the U.N. It was decided to divide New York State into three sections, with New York City a section all by itself. The meeting was the beginning of this work, and I am delighted to get them organized and working together successfully.

Saturday morning I flew out to Peoria, Illinois, where I spoke in the evening to the Illinois Congress of Parents and Teachers, and, on Sunday noon, at a Bonds for Israel lunch. Afterward I flew back to New York, arriving a little before nine o'clock in the evening.

The whole of Monday morning will be devoted to work in the AAUN, for I brought back from California some questions of organization to be discussed and answered.

Speaking of the U.N., I was distressed to read that, at a meeting in Washington, the Daughters of the American Revolution adopted a resolution reaffirming their strong disapproval of any attempt to bring about world government or partial world government through the U.N. or any other medium. Since the U.N. has never attempted to bring about world government, this seems to me a very misleading resolution.

In many countries, including the U.S., there are groups who believe that world government, limited to questions dealing with war or the causes of war, is the only answer if we want to prevent war. I feel, however, that it would be impossible to have world government now. With many others, I feel that the U.N. has to build understanding and cooperation among the nations throughout the world. Though none of us can say what would seem wise in dealing with the remote future, we believe that every effort should be bent to the strengthening of the U.N. as it is—retaining the sovereignty of every member country, but helping us all to grow in world understanding and cooperation.

Since the U.N. is only a machinery which the member nations use, it is obvious that this resolution of the DAR should have been addressed to the member governments, and not to the machinery which they operate.

I was glad to see that the head of one DAR chapter from Glens Falls, N. Y., while expressing disapproval of world government, spoke up in favor of the U.N. We need a little more knowledge such as this lady possesses, and then we would have fewer futile resolutions such as were passed by the DAR in their last session.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL