My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Thursday—Evidently Senator McCarthy considers that any career man who stays at his job and does it loyally should be considered a bad security risk, because he is now going to speak against Charles E. Bohlen for the simple reason that he was "one of the Acheson-Truman foreign policy planners."

Someone wrote to me not long ago and asked if I could give some cases in which Senator McCarthy was proved wrong. Well, this Bohlen episode is one that I hope my questioner will remember because it is such a clear case of speaking without giving any real thought to what you say. This is one of the Senator's faults.

In our New York newspapers I saw an interesting photograph of Governor Thomas E. Dewey enjoying a birthday cake and with his Lieutenant Governor, Moore, sharing his cake. The two governors were 51 and 57, respectively, and I read that Governor Dewey had no celebration to speak of, but had worked just as usual. This doesn't seem to me a very happy way of marking a birthday, but perhaps Governor Dewey is not one who thinks much of birthdays and holidays, anyway. We can all wish him many more happier birthdays, however.

It was interesting to read that nine people had survived the recent atom blast and had felt no ill effects so far, though they crouched in a five-foot ditch just a mile and a half away. Perhaps we are going to find there are ways of surviving even this dread weapon. But it probably will be some time before any conclusions may be made regarding possible after-effects after having been as near as that to an atomic explosion.

In spite of the fact that the farm population in the United States is said to have gone down in the past few years, the production of food seems to grow no less. There is an embargo now on the importation of many farm products because under the price-support programs the government has had to buy quantities of butter and various other products that are in oversupply.

I suppose the logical answer would be that when a surplus like this is built up, the government might sell these surpluses at reduced price in areas of the world where they are much needed. And in return we should try to work out an exchange of some kind that would be of value to the United States. This probably would take much planning, but eventually there will have to be some formula worked out to correct the situation.

You cannot regulate overproduction completely because so many factors enter that will bring good crops above the average every now and then. As an emergency measure foodstuffs were once destroyed, but I always felt that where there was need in the world and people were hungry this was not the final answer.

It will be interesting to see if under the new Administration, some original ideas will come out that will solve these problems—problems that go deep in the area of international exchange.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL