My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Monday—My son James has been here from the West Coast for a few days and we drove up to the country together early Saturday afternoon. It was a beautiful drive in beautiful weather. In the evening we had dinner with Mr. and Mrs. Henry Morgenthau Jr. at their farm and had the pleasure of finding his daughter, Dr. Joan Morgenthau, there also. It is hard for me to realize that the small girl I knew such a short while ago is now a full-fledged doctor.

Sunday morning James and I went to church together and then to the library to meet the delegation from Luxembourg. Mr. H. R. Madol, chairman of the Luxembourg Society, brought as a gift to the library a letter from A. de Lanno in a most beautiful binding. The letter, he says, deals with genealogical questions which he felt sure Mr. Herman Kahn, the director of the library, would find of interest.

Mr. Madol was accompanied by many members of the Luxembourg Society. I met them all and thanked them for their thoughtful gesture.

We went over to my husband's grave, as the Minister from Luxembourg had wanted to place a wreath there. Unfortunately, he was not well and could not come, but he asked Mr. Corneille Staudt, Luxembourg consul in New York, to read his message.

Then I said goodbye to the main party, and four of them, including J.P. Kremer, Luxembourg delegate to the U.N., and Mrs. Kremer, Mr. Staudt and Mr. Madol, came back to my cottage for lunch. After lunch they returned to the library for a tour of the house and the library which they had not been able to see earlier.

Little green shoots are poking their heads up in the swamps and along the edges of the full brook and even in the garden I can see little green signs of life. Every weekend we will see more, and I am delighted to be here to see the wonder of returning spring.

There is so much work to be done at this season, however, that my youngest son, John, who has the responsibility of running the place here, finds it difficult to realize from week to week what are the needs. He thinks he has everything planned and then he finds something more that has to be done.

The month of February saw a rise in the number of visitors at the memorial library. Good weather makes a tremendous difference. In the winter months bad roads and bad weather make people want to stay by their own firesides but as soon as the weather improves it is a temptation to be out and to look for some interesting trip within reach of home.

I am impressed whenever I stay away for a few weeks by the rapidity with which houses are going up in this vicinity. I saw a great many more today, so evidently the saturation point in the need for new houses in this area has not yet been reached.

It is still cold and winter might still suddenly descend upon us in a last flurry of snow and wind, but at least according to the calendar spring is here and I think this is always a most exciting time of year.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL