My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Tuesday—In denouncing its treaty of friendship with the Soviet Union, the Chinese Nationalist government may annoy the Soviets, but I cannot see how this action will have any very practical results soon. The two ports of Dairen and Port Arthur, over which Russia was given temporary control, are, so far as I know, in the hands of the Chinese Republic. And I imagine the Chinese will do their best to get full control back in their hands as soon as the agreement with Russia comes to an end.

It is interesting, of course, to know that the Nationalist government hopes eventually to free Outer Mongolia from Soviet influence but how this is to be done remains uncertain until we see future developments.

The Chinese-Russian agreements, of course, were made in an effort to bring Russia's strength to bear against Japan, and if the Nationalist government is successful in regaining control of China, today's action probably will be of some interest to Russia. At the moment however, I would doubt that anyone in the Kremlin is lying awake nights over the effect of this announcement.

There seems to be no end to the unfortunate things that are unearthed in connection with New York harbor. It appears that once we had fishing boats actually discharging their wares at New York City ports. Now the story reads that "some wholesalers have a virtual stranglehold on the two city-owned docks, and boats by-pass New York month after month to unload their cargoes in New England's free, competitive markets.

I have just received a most-fascinating toy. It came to me from the U.N. Gram Publishing Company at 220 East 46th Street, New York City, and is called the Dial-a-gram. It is a fund of information and answers almost any question you can think of in relation to the United Nations or the specialized agencies of the U.N.

For instance, you turn your top sheet around till the long slit coincides with the alphabetical agency about which you desire information. I have just turned to WHO and I find that its budget is 7.6 million; it has 82 members; and was established in 1948. Its main office is in Geneva, Switzerland; its field of operation deals with all health problems; and it is a specialized agency.

I can get this same kind of information for any number of other organizations.

On the back of the round Dial-a-gram you find a photograph of the new U.N. Building in New York City, and all the member nations of the U.N. are listed. For instance, if I dial number 37 I find the following information: Holland's flag is red, white-and-blue; its chief industries are dairy products, textiles, shipbuilding and flowers; it has a population of 10.3 million and the density of people per square mile is 815.7. The main language is Dutch; the total area is 12,505 square miles; the national income is 5,000 million dollars, and 502 dollars is the income per capita. Her contribution to the main U.N. budget is 1.27 percent and the per capita contribution is 5.36.

I think every home should have one of these Dial-a-grams. They certainly give one a great deal of information.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL