My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Wednesday—Two events of great importance have cast a shadow over the last few days.

The death of Philip Murray, president of the C.I.O., is a real loss to the country. He was a wise and temperate leader. He wanted the best possible conditions for his men but he knew that these were only possible in a sound and safe United States. His leadership and wisdom will be sadly missed in the days to come. To his family and his friends and to his many followers in the labor circles of the country, I would like to extend my warm and deep sympathy.

The second event that is deeply disturbing is the resignation of Trygve Lie, Secretary General of the United Nations. The reason, he said, is his inability to obtain cooperation from the Soviet Union. But I wonder who could possibly win that cooperation without complete subservience. I greatly fear the election of a new Secretary General will only enhance the divergencies and bring out more clearly the differences between the Soviet Union and other areas of the world.

We will lose in Mr. Lie a man of high integrity, of great devotion to the U.N. and to the cause of peace in the world. I see him go with deep regret and can only hope that the U.N. will find in a new Secretary General a leader able to bring about harmony where there is at present so little understanding. I have to acknowledge, however, that that seems almost an impossibility.

In Arizona I found my Arizona Education Association audience overflowed from one hall into another, and I had to visit the two different rooms to answer questions. Then I went to a luncheon given by the press club, and here again questions and answers were the order of the day.

In Beverly Hills, Calif., my lecture was well received by a good audience that filled the Beverly Hills High School auditorium. The second afternoon in Beverly Hills I attended a reception arranged by Herman Lissauer, the Forum founder, and met a number of interested people who also plied me with questions relating to the U.N.

Among those who came to shake me by the hand was a young man who asked me if I remembered Townsville in Australia where he met me the last time. All these towns in Northern Australia, in which our troops were stationed, are unforgettably fixed in my memory. The people there were very kind in greeting me and they were so understanding of our men. They invited our troops into their homes and let them raid the icebox just as though the boys were in their own homes thousands of miles away.

I met an interesting group of doctors and their families while I was in Beverly Hills, since my daughter has married a doctor, and I am happy to say they are delightful people. There were a number of parties for my daughter and her husband at which young and old were happily mixed and all had a good time.

The same I think can be said of my daughter's wedding the other day. I hope that life will always be as happy and as simple and as genuinely delightful in atmosphere as it was on her wedding day.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL