My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Sunday—I had a little talk on Thursday with a gentleman who thinks he has really found a way for the United States to save the world, and I am waiting now for further information on his plan, which I will submit to wiser heads than mine. I always marvel at the confidence of people who think they really have the answer to how to meet the world's problems.

Mrs. Edith Sampson and I also had a little talk in the lounge of the U.N. Thursday. She is working with the representatives of the nongovernmental organizations and I think will accomplish a great deal. She is trying very hard to make them understand that it is actually the nongovernmental organizations that are the basis of the strength underlying the U.N.

I believe that the Austrian Student Good-Will Tour to North America, which was carried out under Austrian sponsorship with the aid of American co-sponsors, is now going to broaden out and will try to go to all the Western European nations. I should think this group of students could make many friends for their country throughout Europe, though, of course, they will not be the novelty there that they were here. I hope they will have a successful trip and return not only to us in the United States but to the whole North and South American continents.

I had a letter today from Miss Blanche Delaney, who is giving a concert on Sunday evening, November 9, in the hope of raising money for charitable purposes in the Harlem area. I had to tell her that I would be unable to go that night but I am sure that many will attend this event, which is given annually.

And now in these last days of the campaign, there is a suggestion that I have been asked to bring to the attention of my readers.

A young woman told me that she and a group of her friends who are housewives have found they could easily save and give to Governor Stevenson's campaign small amounts of their household money. Although each contributed only a little, their total was a sizable sum and they sent it in to the New York radio fund.

She suggests that I pass along to all of you the thought that if a million of you save one dollar, the money is worth far more than it would be if given by one or ten or a hundred people, because it means that a million good citizens are listening to speeches and making up their minds on the evidence of what they hear.

Even if you think it is late to contribute, save a dollar and send it in, for when the campaign is over, political organizations must still go on and money is needed for their work in every state in the Union.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL