My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Sunday—I hope every American citizen is listening to both General Eisenhower and Governor Stevenson on the radio and watching them on TV. I have faith in the judgment of the people of this country. If they listen to General Eisenhower and to Governor Stevenson, I think on election day the votes will be cast for the man who really clarifies the issues and discusses them—Governor Stevenson—and not for the man who makes wild promises.

General Eisenhower promised in a speech last Thursday that in four years taxes could be cut and the country could have a completely balanced budget. How can he know what will happen in the next four years? He is making promises to get votes, but I do not think the people of the United States are as gullible as he evidently thinks they are. General Eisenhower does not give the people credit for the ability to understand present day situations.

Back of the general's speech on economics lay some of the philosophy of a few of our big industralists—not many, thank heavens, but a few. I heard of one who remarked the other day that he would rejoice to see a line of men waiting for work outside of his plants again, for then it would be possible to get a good day's work out of men. A person who feels that way cannot care what happens to his fellow men, and I am afraid the general does not understand where he is being led. I prefer the honesty with which Governor Stevenson faced this same subject.

Friday morning in Washington I spent almost the whole morning at the UNESCO meeting. Before the formal speeches the group went over the recommendations made by the various committees, and I found their report very interesting.

UNESCO must concentrate on some of the attacks being made both against UNESCO and the U.N. I feel we must realize that these attacks stem from the sources that have been constantly fighting for isolationism in the United States. People who used to be America Firsters are now engaged in attacking the U.N. and UNESCO.

The isolationist forces work hand in hand with men such as McCarthy and Jenner, who frighten people about Communism but don't educate them so that they are immune from any danger of being caught in the Communist web.

I got back from Washington Friday afternoon just in time to sit down and talk with a gentleman who had written me saying that, unless some of us became interested in certain questions regarding our American dollars, sooner or later we were all going to be in trouble. I soon found that I did not know enough about this subject to cope with him alone, and I decided I had better get someone to help me who knew more about the theories of the use of money as a medium of exchange than I did. I promised my visitor to try and get some more intelligent person to join me in this particular discussion at a future date.

Friday evening we had a wonderful dinner in a little French restaurant on East 49th Street. I had never been there before, but I found the food excellent and the atmosphere almost like a little restaurant in Paris.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL