My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

Text Size: Small Text Normal Text Large Text Larger Text

HYDE PARK, Tuesday—Many newspapers are saying that Senator Nixon's recent explanation of his private fund was "a shot in the arm for the GOP." Apparently the Republicans needed such a boost, but that is a fact I had not before realized.

The surveys show a tremendous reaction in favor of the Republican vice presidential candidate in this particular case. I am not at all surprised by these results. He made a highly emotional plea and many must have felt that he was fighting for his political life. And, in addition, many felt that what he had done should certainly not cost him his political life.

I have one or two letters reminding me that before my husband ran for Governor of New York, John Jacob Raskob offered to take on his obligations to Warm Springs, Ga. I wish the readers would read this whole story in my autobiography because they are entirely mistaken if they think that my husband's running for office was decided because of financial consideration. This is one case which I know all about, and I have very carefully written in my book exactly what happened.

* * *

The weather has been delightful this last day or two and as one walks through the woods where the leaves are only just beginning to turn, one feels a kind of hush—as though the trees were waiting for the change to cold and rain, and finally to snow and ice. Every now and then a flock of birds appears and yesterday morning I saw a most beautiful one among them with white and blue wings and back. I could not describe it accurately enough to find out what kind it was, but the flash of color as it flew into the leaves of a tree was very beautiful.

My son John's family, next door, moved to New York City on Sunday to start school, and for their dog and cat the lonely winter months have really begun. All summer these two pets, which are staying with us, have been the children's inseparable companions. Now the cat withdraws from us all, and only comes to get his food, waiting for the weekends when his family returns to be sociable. The dog, Rebel, goes walking with Tamas and me and comes to sleep on our porch and also comes for his food. But he, too, roams around his own house so he will be sure not to miss seeing his family if by any chance they should turn up.

When we leave today Tamas and Duffy will be lonely, too, though they will get more attention from our people who are in the house than they do when we are home. They settle down very happily with my two people who look after them, but the minute Miss Thompson and I are back they fall into their usual habits, as though nothing had happened. The joy with which they greet us when we return for the weekends makes us feel it is wicked to stay away.

Next Monday, however, I must be in New York City and this afternoon will see us really moving down in preparation for beginning work on the United Nations General Assembly, which meets again October 14th.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL