My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Friday—Not long ago I received from India a panoramic view covering a distance of three miles. It is an interesting photograph, and to those who belong to the Hindu religion it probably would have more than mere historic and artistic interest.

I thought Benares, which is in the picture, was one of the most interesting cities I visited in India and I was glad to be able to go on the holy Ganges and get a close view of the ghats. I found the city itself, with its narrow streets and crowds of people and the many sacred bullocks wandering in and out of the temple gateways a really unique experience.

Benares is a city of many temples and its special claim to religious distinction is that Gautama Buddha first preached his doctrines in this city. Some of the temples are very old.

I mention this picture because the photographer, Mr. Shalom, thought there might be people in this country who would be interested to know that they had finally succeeded in making a panoramic picture.

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While I was in Chicago recently there was an editorial in Colonel McCormick's paper that amused me greatly. The colonel, having founded a new party to which this year he seems to be calling only Senators and Representatives, is free to condemn both 1952 Presidential candidates. This particular editorial column, whether written by him or a subordinate, said some delicious things, among them:

"Mr. Stevenson, the property of the CIO, says he is not a Socialist but he has a Socialist brain trust to guide him.

"General Eisenhower is a Democrat who is running on the Republican ticket with the blessing of Wall Street, which arranged his nomination."

Of the two I think the general, according to this, is in the more difficult, because he is sailing under false colors and that horrible bugbear, Wall Street, has actually had something to do with his nomination.

Certainly, General Eisenhower is working very hard to conciliate labor, and, for a candidate named by Wall Street, this seems rather dangerous. But perhaps he feels about this as he evidently feels about appearing with Senator Jenner and Senator McCarthy. If you can appear united your real feelings do not matter, and when the election is safely in the bag you announce that you never made any pre-election promises and you never intended to take certain characters to your bosom.

Governor Stevenson, on the other hand, is accused of being owned by the CIO. He hasn't acknowledged this ownership and his speeches don't exactly sound as though they were written by the CIO or any other labor organization or leaders, for he has promised equal treatment for everybody. But, of course, that carries no weight with Colonel McCormick. The latter is frightened about Governor Stevenson's advisers and says they are a Socialist brain trust. Somehow, I never thought of Arthur Schlesinger Jr. as a Socialist. Did you?

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL