My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Wednesday—I came down for a day in New York City last Monday with my grandson, Curtis Roosevelt. His wife and baby are spending the month of August at Hyde Park and I have never seen a better, healthier and altogether satisfactory young lady of five months of age. I think her parents have done very well by her so far and I hope her month there in the country will be of benefit to her.

I lunched at the Ritz with our friend, Major Henry S. Hooker, and felt extremely gay and giddy after our quiet country life. Then I proceeded to the United Nations Building where I had been requested to meet a few people in Mr. Benjamin Cohen's office.

This is the month when the United States delegate presides in the Security Council, and I am hoping to have a glimpse of Ambassador and Mrs. Austin while I am here. They have just come down from Vermont to perform this service.

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On Sunday at Hyde Park we had the pleasure of seeing a group of post-graduate students, a group that spends five or six weeks at Yale in the summer before scattering to their various colleges. They represented many different countries. I was interested to find one from Nepal and one from Libya.

I should think students from the various countries, where conditions are so very different from what they find in the U. S., would require some very careful consideration of how and where they work in this country. Coming here could turn out to be a very unprofitable undertaking unless care were taken to get just the right training. Conditions are so different here from what they had been accustomed to and will face on their return that unless they find their right niche and location in our country they could easily become frustrated.

Mrs. Aung Sang of Bangkok told me that in consultation with the Children's Bureau she had mapped out a program in her efforts to get help for her own maternal and childcare problems which would take her through our South. Dr. Martha Eliot felt that conditions there would be sufficiently comparable so that Mrs. Sang's experiences and findings would be valuable to her when she returned to Bangkok. Our big cities and some of our more developed rural sections would be of very little use in Bangkok and the surrounding countryside.

That same consideration holds good in many other lines of work, and it seems to me important that these students profit by what is offered them at Yale and get as much advice on how to make their experiences here actually count when they get home. It would be so easy to take it for granted that they would have exactly the same situations when they reached home as they faced here, and we all know that is practically impossible.

I also met the Cuban-American Committee for a wreath-laying ceremony at my husband's grave after church on Sunday.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL