My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Friday—Last Tuesday Evening now seems like it was a dream. It was all done so quickly. I left New York City at four o'clock in the afternoon and I was back in my hotel before four o'clock the next morning.

From the time I was greeted at the Chicago airport the convention atmosphere seemed all around us. I was taken by surprise when the delegates gave me such a warm and kindly greeting, but I realized that hearing the band play "Happy Days Are Here Again" had touched off memories in the hearts of many of the delegates. It was a very moving tribute to my husband's memory. He would have deeply appreciated and enjoyed the warmth and enthusiasm of all those present. I think he always really got a tremendous amount of inspiration and personal pleasure from these gatherings and that is why I think he always gave out so much in return.

I had felt it would be very difficult to make a speech on the United Nations when nearly everybody's mind was occupied with such subjects as credentials, nominating speeches, maneuvering behind the scenes, and, above everything else, the candidates. I was very grateful since by having a number of people say they had been given insight into the work of the U.N.

My niece, Mrs. Edward Elliott, met me at the station when I reached Poughkeepsie Wednesday morning and my first question was: "Do we have to go to the market?" The hot days we have been having do not make marketing for our large family exactly a joy, though ordinarily I find it quite pleasant. I like to take my trundle cart and fill it up with food. At first I could not find what I wanted on the shelves, but gradually I am learning where everything is.

I used to telephone an order and then have it picked up, but I found that was rather extravagant. Now I go and pick and choose.

The other day someone told me they took some foreign guests whom they were entertaining to one of our supermarkets, and the Latin Americans were thrilled to find products such as canned corned beef from Argentina and Brazilian coffee on sale.

In the market I had one amusing experience when a gentleman who evidently had had one or two drinks too many, looked at me as I was having my purchases added up and, leaning toward me, said in a loud whisper: "I know who you are; you can't fool me even if nobody else here knows you." I assured him that a great many people knew me and that he had not made any startling discovery.

I was not sorry, however, to find that my shopping was all done last Wednesday and we could go straight home for a swim before lunch. I was glad to find my aunt and uncle, Mr. and Mrs. David Gray, safely ensconsed here for a brief visit before they return to Portland, Maine.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL