My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Friday—Tuesday noon in Hyde Park the Citizenship Encampment, which is run every summer by the Ethical Culture Society, had a picnic on my grounds. This has been its annual custom.

It was a particularly interesting group this year, and I enjoyed the chance to meet them. This effort to inform young people as to what citizenship in a democracy should be is one of the most important things that can be done in this country.

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Radio Corporation of America, according to its director, General David Sarnoff, is developing through a scholarship and fellowship program young scientists and engineers to work in industrial corporations, research laboratories and scientific institutions.

This is a very forward-looking program, and since 1945, when it was started, there have been over 100 students who completed their education with the aid of these scholarships and fellowships. Postgraduate fellowships were undertaken in 1947 and were offered to students working toward advanced degrees in scientific fields related to electronics.

I met General Sarnoff not long ago at luncheon at a friend's house and I thought at the time that he was expressing some points of view that did not seem to coincide very well with the progressive way in which he was trying to meet the future scientific needs through a plan such as this one.

It is often interesting to me to see that a man will be far-sighted and plan for the future in a field like science where he fully understands the needs to be met, but in politics he may frequently not look much beyond the immediate situation.

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The other day I had a letter from my friend, Mrs. William B. Olmstead Jr., who is the American representative of the American Library in Paris. This library also has branches in Roubia, Toulouse, Rennes, Montpelier and Grenoble. She has been trying for the past year to form groups of friends of the American Library in Paris in as many communities as possible in the United States. She hopes that these friends will send American books and magazines to France.

The library has for sale at 25 cents apiece some double cards and envelopes. These cards show fine colortype reproductions of etchings by Samuel Chamberlain. They are views of France which anyone who has traveled there would be glad to have them as a reminder of his trip. Their purchase represents a contribution to the work of the library.

We all know what an effort our government is making through the U.S. Information Service libraries to create better understanding between us and the many countries of the world. But Mrs. Olmstead's undertaking is just an added way in which we can help in France, where we have historical affiliations and where it should be very easy to build better understanding and goodwill.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL