My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

Text Size: Small Text Normal Text Large Text Larger Text

NEW YORK, Wednesday—I was a guest yesterday at the luncheon and meeting of the International Federation of Business and Professional Women's Clubs at the Savoy Plaza Hotel, here. Dame Caroline Haslett, president of the federation, presided at the meeting, attended by 300 delegates and observers which included 100 women from 19 countries.

These women all stand for real achievement in their countries. They have reached a station in life where they can be looked upon as of value to their homelands.

It is important for us to realize, as women, particularly as members of a professional group, that the international situation touches us in our daily lives. The United Nations, for example, is important to all of us. It is the machinery through which we can work for broader understanding. But the U.N. will be no stronger than each individual nation can become through education and understanding on the part of its people.

We must use all possible media of mass education, and where TV and radio are available to the people we should use them to the limit.

In this country the U.N. has carried out an enlightening campaign to inform the radio audience where and when it can get news of what goes on in the world organization. Newspapers, too, are essential to this education, for it is easy to forget what you may have heard on the radio. One cannot always remember what one has heard and seen on TV, either. But if there is a published account in a newspaper, one can always refer to it whenever there is an uncertainty.

I hope the women from so many different countries attending the current sessions will take away a feeling of their strength and the possibilities for usefulness that lie ahead.

* * *

I wonder how many people read with care the account of Senator Joseph McCarthy's answers to a pre-trial examination, in his suit against the Syracuse Post-Standard, before New York Supreme Court Justice Kingsly. Defense counsel Tracy H. Ferguson asked the Senator certain questions and his answers were extraordinarily enlightening.

For instance, the Senator remarked, "The reason I do not read the Milwaukee Journal is because I would know the line they would follow—the Daily Worker line." I wonder who Senator McCarthy expects to convince by a remark like that.

People who read the Milwaukee Journal know it is a conservative Republican newspaper, and they are more apt to think that if the Daily Worker follows the same line then the Daily Worker has turned conservative.

The Senator from Wisconsin also said, "I read substantially the same editorial, either in the Daily Worker or the Washington Post." The Judge asked, "Are you confused between these two papers?" To which Senator McCarthy seems to have replied, "They parallel each other pretty closely."

I think the heat in Washington or in Syracuse must have gone to the poor Senator's head. He can't expect us to believe that the Washington Post is a Communist paper, or that the Christian Science Monitor, Time Magazine or the Saturday Evening Post have turned into Communist publications.

This is too much, Senator. You must leave us a few conservative Republican and independent publications!

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL