My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

Text Size: Small Text Normal Text Large Text Larger Text

NEW YORK, Tuesday—I am very much interested to find that one of our New York newspapers has taken the trouble to really unmask two particular newspaper writers.

In a recent book these men said they were telling the truth about America and its people. Now this newspaper is proving that some of the things they said were not truthful.

A good many of us realized that some time ago and felt quite sure that even though this book might become a best-seller it would not reach that status just because the American people would be interested to see what some people can say. They rarely believe such things and when accusations are made against the country as a whole and its people, the readers just don't pay any attention.

Take for instance the little sentence: "America is becoming a land of manicured hermaphrodites, going the way of Rome."

This was written apparently without thought to what some other nations may think. Fortunately, other nations rarely take seriously such accusations made in this light manner. All they do is look down upon the Americans who are so willing to run down their own country.

The two writers of whom I speak, authors of "USA Confidential," claim to be very much afraid of the harm that Communists can do. But they are quite unaware of the fact that they do as much harm as the Communists when they indulge in running down our country and our people as a whole.

All I can say is cheers for the newspaper that takes the trouble to stand up for us and our own people by unmasking untruths such as these correspondents have written.

* * *

All of us must hope that President Truman is right and that there will be a quick settlement of the steel dispute. No one can be really happy until this cloud is removed from our horizon.

* * *

Every now and then some little thing that I did years ago brings me an entertaining experience.

Two young women came to lunch with me at the United Nations yesterday. They are sisters, one of whom I had known when she got her first job in New York City at about the age of sixteen. She now is married and has a boy in high school who is as tall as she is! The two women had never been to the U.N. before and, after lunch, I took them through part of the building and saw a good deal that even I had never seen before.

I did not even know where the delegates' lounge was but I found it yesterday. We saw many of the other rooms, and in talking to my two friends I realized that the average American has the most interest in seeing where the Security Council sits. That seems to be the U.N. agency with which most people are familiar.

* * *

I left the Human Rights Commission at three o'clock yesterday for a short time to speak to a very dignified group of French gentlemen who are in this country at the invitation of our military security people. They are spending two weeks here and went over the U.N. building quite thoroughly yesterday.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL