My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Monday—General Eisenhower is certainly an attractive candidate. He fascinates the press and the people alike, and it is easy to understand why there is so much interest in this pre-convention campaign.

Both parties have people contending who attract the public interest. I never get into a taxicab in New York City without being asked what I think of the candidates, for taxicab drivers are famous for their political discussions. They hear so much from people riding in their cabs that they get interested in hearing more. They sometimes make up their own minds as to where they stand but they still like to needle their passengers into talking about their candidates and the reasons why they are for or against them.

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Last weekend was the first sunny one we have had in weeks and I just couldn't remain indoors. We went to church Sunday morning and had our first luncheon out-of-doors by the swimming pool. But nobody yet has ventured to go swimming. The water still seems a little too cold.

I wonder if anyone else is finding their tulip poplars either very slow in producing their leaves or actually stymied for some reason from producing any for this season. We have three beautiful tulip poplars and I am worried about their lack of leaves so far. This week I hope we can get a tree man in the county to come and look at them.

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This is our last week of work in the Human Rights Commission. As I see it, there is no chance of our finishing implementation. This will suit the Soviet delegates, since they do not think there should be any implementation except what the states do themselves. But they certainly would not agree to any international effort to bring public opinion to bear.

Implementation is nothing more than trying to think out some rules that can be applied to countries and put in motion if any country does not live up to what it has agreed to do by ratifying the Human Rights Covenant.

As presently conceived, the rules would take the form of having one state bring a complaint against another state, saying it was not living up to certain of its promises. Then a committee on human rights would hear both sides and try to bring about some settlement.

If, however, nothing could be done, the complainant would notify the Secretary-General of the United Nations and state what happened. This report would be sent out to all U.N. member states, informing them of what the complaint was and why no settlement had been reached. This is a very mild form of implementation, but it might be effective.

We will, I think, finish the articles in both covenants so they will be ready to present simultaneously, and perhaps the Economic and Social Council and the General Assembly will discuss these articles and make recommendations on implementation and even on the articles themselves for the next Human Rights Commission session in 1952. The commission undoubtedly will have to ask to hold the meeting in order to finish its task.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL