My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Sunday—My trip to Texas for the graduation of my granddaughter, Chandler, gave me great pleasure. I must say I had never seen more delightful arrangements for a commencement. Of course, it is always pleasant to be able to hold such ceremonies out of doors. On this occasion it threatened to rain, which is rare in Texas, but the rain did not begin to fall until after the ceremonies were over.

The girls looked lovely in their summer dresses of organdy and their large picture hats blending pastel shades of green, yellow, pink, blue and mauve. I was particularly proud of Chandler, who had won four very special honors the day before. I was much pleased, too, by the spirit of the school. Every girl I saw seemed to have a real concern about doing her best. They were not just getting by, as I find so often is the attitude of the young people, but really using their abilities to the very best advantage.

Last year a group of educators from different parts of the country, among them the head of the Brearley School in New York City, came down to Hockaday School and spent a week evaluating their teaching processes. As a result of the report some changes were made, but I gather the report was a favorable one. Their senior girls live in separate cottages with a common sitting room, and Chandler and her roommate had a bedroom and a little study of their own. Next autumn both girls are coming to Vassar. They will room together again and I shall hope to see a great deal of them when they are settled nearby. I love having young people around and I look forward to the coming school year. Chandler will perhaps bring her friends over on weekends. Her brother, Elliott, Junior, who will be at Andover School, is allowed, I believe, a weekend at home every month. I suppose this is conditioned on good behavior and good marks, so I pray that both of my grandchildren will do well this coming year as they have in the past. They may have an extra task to meet, for I know that a move from the South to the North usually means a period of adjustment to new ways of work and varying standards in the courses which are taken.

My trip was rather hectic. The return plane was due to leave Dallas at 1:55 a.m., but we did not take off until 3:30 a.m. and we reached New York City at noon on Wednesday instead of being in before 10 o'clock. I had to hustle to get to the U.N. Building by lunch time and be briefed on what had occurred during my absence of a day and a half. I found that not too much had happened, and I settled back into the routine very rapidly.

On Thursday afternoon, before I left for Hyde Park, the Secretary General and Mrs. Lie gave a tea on the 38th floor in the U.N. Building for the Social Commission, the Human Rights Commission and the Economic and Social Council. The view from both sides of the building was simply magnificent. On one side the varied city skyline was highly dramatic, and on the other side the river and Long Island made a fascinating outlook.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL