My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Monday—Friday evening last week I went out to speak at the services of the Men's Club of Congregation Beth Torah in Orange, N.J. I had barely got back from the United Nations meeting and through my work at home in time to start my journey to Jersey. And I got home from there around midnight, which is rather later than I like to be out making speeches!

Fortunately, I was staying in town on Saturday. Also, my daughter was coming in from the West Coast on a plane in the early hours of Saturday morning, so being late was rather a blessing because it made the time I had to wait for her seem shorter. It was a wonderful surprise to have her come East. Particularly nice was the fact that she was able to be in Hyde Park with her son and daughter-in-law for the christening of her granddaughter.

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Miss Thompson and I stayed in New York City on Saturday. I went to see Miss Fannie Hurst, who is leaving Wednesday to attend the World Health Organization meeting in Geneva, Switzerland. She invited me to meet Mr. and Mrs. Willy Pogany. He is a painter and illustrator.

When I arrived at Miss Hurst's apartment the roof was leaking, so we all went down to Mr. Pogany's studio and had tea. He has a very charming wife and has done many portraits of her, which hang in the studio. I must say I enjoyed seeing his work.

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Sunday morning Miss Thompson and I took the train for Poughkeepsie and we found my grandson and his wife and my great granddaughter, my granddaughter's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Burton Edwards, and my own daughter all enthralled by the baby. She is a sweet little thing with a wonderful disposition. She never cried at all. She was dressed in the same christening dress that I wore. However, this youngster used it as a petticoat, and wore my daughter's christening dress on top of it. All the girls in the family have used these dresses since Anna wore them.

I am particularly fond of the one that was my christening dress since it was made for me by my Aunt Ella, whose husband, Captain Bullock, was one of the Bullocks of Georgia. This proud gentleman was not granted amnesty after the Civil War because he had supervised the building in Great Britain of the blockade runners and had served on them. He stayed in Great Britain and became an official of the Cunard Line.

Aunt Ella was one of my grandmother's favorite relatives and adored my father. So, when I was christened she made me this dress with so much fine handwork that I have always wondered how anyone could have had the patience to do it. Even when my children were born she sent the most beautiful little knit garments. I never went abroad from the time of my first boarding school days over there without going to see her as long as she lived.

By late afternoon on Sunday everybody, except my daughter and Miss Thompson and I, started back to New York City by train or by car. We spent a quiet evening, but had to get up at dawn this morning to take the train down in time for the U.N. meeting.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL