My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Thursday—I don't think I ever remember as much excitement in our newspaper during previous Presidential campaigns about the results in the primaries! Even my taxicab driver yesterday morning said to me: "Well, it seems to be a big race on both sides for the nomination." Neither do I remember quite so many military figures taking part in political campaigns as seem to be in the forefront everywhere in this campaign.

If a military man is not actually a candidate, he is backing some other military figure who is a candidate and this is quite a change in a country which, since the days of Ulysses S. Grant, has not seen so much activity politically on the part of well-known military figures.

Usually our generals and admirals are heroes and receive great adulation, but when it comes down to day-by-day political responsibilities, these generally have been left in the hands of civilians. Whether this is a good or bad change we are undergoing I do not really know, but it is an interesting phenomenon which we should be aware of and watch as it develops.

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It is certainly nice being home again. I picked up a second taxi yesterday morning and the driver said to me: "How nice to have you home, Mrs. Roosevelt. I feel as though I were greeting an old friend. I have had your son, Franklin Junior, several times, coming out of his office and I think he is a swell guy." So on two counts my heart warmed to that particular gentleman.

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In writing this column I must say a word of welcome to Her Majesty, the Queen of the Netherlands, who is paying her first visit as a Queen to this country.

She spent some years in Canada during the war. With her husband and children she visited this country and stayed with my husband and myself a number of times both in the White House and in Hyde Park. I grew to know her while she was in America and my admiration and affection has increased with the years and with each meeting.

I must also warmly welcome His Royal Highness, Prince Bernhard, a charming and delightful person. He earned the place he now holds in the hearts of the Dutch people through his bravery and devotion to their interests during the years of the occupation.

This young couple has assumed heavy burdens, for no royal family in any country in Europe can be without cares because of the burdens on their people today.

But both in Holland and in Great Britain the young couples who are now carrying the burden have the confidence of their people. As far as the Queen of the Netherlands is concerned, the people of the United States will understand the simple and democratic way in which she likes to behave in her contacts with other people. We will give her and Prince Bernhard a warm welcome, I hope, and make them feel that they are at home with us.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL