My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Wednesday—Settling down again here and preparing for the forthcoming weekend with Queen Juliana of the Netherlands, I find myself reflecting on my first two days back in the country, which were Sunday and Monday, following my speedy and event-filled round-the-world trip home from Paris.

Arriving in Los Angeles on Sunday morning, I found Elliott and his wife and Anna and her Johnny all at the airport to meet me and we had long talks catching up on all the news.

I repacked and at lunchtime we all went to the home of my son, James. The four youngsters started at once using the Indian flutes I brought, with the result that noise, rather than melody, was the order of the day.

After lunch I spent some hours with my friends, Mr. and Mrs. Hershey Martin and their two children, and in the evening I went to the dinner given by the Humanitarian Society. This group is one of many throughout the country that supports a tuberculosis sanitorium in Denver, Colorado. Though supported by the Humanitarians, which is largely a Jewish organization, it receives patients regardless of race or religion. My son, James, has just gone on the board.

Every year the Humanitarians give an award. Last year it went to George Jessel, who came to preside at the dinner this year at which I was the recipient of the awards. It was a very enjoyable evening and they had a delightful entertainment afterward. We could not stay all through, however, as by 10:30 we began to think of 6 a.m. , which was the hour we got up in Los Angeles.

Monday morning I felt as though my travels were long in the past. Anna came for breakfast and Elliott came also, and the three of us went to see the apartment that Anna is moving into. She had taken her Johnny to a new public school and I felt sorry for him starting with new friends and leaving his old pals in San Francisco. But I am sure he will soon find his new surroundings just as pleasant as those he has had to leave behind. Jimmy's oldest boy is now collecting stamps, so he and Johnny Boettiger evidently inherit their grandfather's taste and I will have to divide all the stamps that come from foreign countries between the two.

Back at James' house by 10:15 I took a part in a movie for the "Model Assembly" which is being held at the University of Southern California. I could not speak at their meeting and so they made this picture to show at their regular meeting. I explained my regrets at not being there and answered two or three questions for them.

After that we went down to the Motion Picture Academy because I had promised Madame Blum in Paris that I would talk over with some of the producers here an idea she had for international education. As always happens, it took much more time than I intended because when one starts talking about something really interesting it is hard to stop.

However, we were only a few minutes late for lunch with some of the directors and associate directors of the Ford Foundation. Here again we had an interesting hour and a half talking over the very helpful work they are doing in many of the countries I have been through in the past few weeks. I was glad to find that their conclusions and mine were very similar.

Afterwards I returned to the hotel for a little work and then I spent an hour with various friends and a final hour with James, his wife and children before we all went to a dinner given by the Americans for Democratic Action where Senator Wayne Morse of Oregon spoke.

Then I left for the plane and the last lap of my journey back to New York.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL