My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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PARIS. Friday—The first letter about my new little granddaughter has just reached me and I am much amused for I am told she has red hair, blue eyes, fair skin and is really beautiful. It sounds like a most lovely Irish combination and I can hardly bear the thought that I am not going to see her until April. She will give me added reason for hurrying to Washington. Of course, I shall say I am going down to report to the President and the State Department, but I will also be going down to report to my 18th grandchild.

* * *

I had lunch with a Mrs. Afnan of Iraq the day before yesterday and now I understand better her point of view on the question of whether we should have one Covenant of Human Rights or two, even though I do not agree with her.

This may well be ignorance on my part, but I should know a little more by the middle of February. By that time I will have seen a good deal of that part of the world with my own eyes. My round-the-world trip on my way home should be well under way by then.

* * *

Before going up yesterday evening to speak at the Cite Internationale Universitaire, I had dinner with Mr. Baroody of Saudi Arabia. Miss Corr and Sistie also joined us.

I think I was able to explain my point of view on two controversial points, though he did not change his but said he was bowing to the will of the majority.

I always learn a great deal in talking with him because he reminds me of many things that happened in the past that I had completely forgotten. It is well for us to realize that actions which seem to some of us as lost in the dim, dark areas of the past are still matter of vital concern to people who were really involved in them. One may find in these things the roots of present-day attitudes which would otherwise be unintelligible.

* * *

We saw an exhibition of student paintings at the International House, and some of the paintings were very good.

One young Mexican had a picture of a young Indian girl with calla lilies that was very charming. And there was a "gouache" of a small French port with little red fishing boats bobbing about which made quite a lovely bit of color on the wall.

Some of more modern efforts left me rather cold because I cannot understand them.

The big room was quite filled and questions asked about the U.N. were really intelligent. These young people seemed to be older than our university groups at home and reason probably is that they are, as a rule, graduate students. A number of them are artists, but what interested me most was that there were 62 nations represented in the hall—a little U.N. in itself.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL