My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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PARIS, Friday—In this country, with such frequent changes of party, I should think one of the most difficult positions to occupy is the presidency! No sooner does the government fall than the President has to go to work and try to find someone to head up a new government.

It is certainly not the kind of system that gives any sense of stability either in domestic policies or foreign policies. And at the present time, when it would seem necessary for France to make some rather difficult decisions, it is certainly unfortunate to have a constant change of those in power.

In Committee Three we at least have reached the point where we shall now face actual resolutions and be able to vote on them.

I think we have had so many and such long speeches that the time has come for every member to curtail the length of his talks. The motion made by the delegate from Saudi Arabia to keep the replies to all attacks made by the Soviet group down to 10 minutes was accepted. While it was hard to answer in that time I think the speeches were better.

I had a number of talks both before and after lunch with various delegates and late in the afternoon I went to a meeting of a rather interesting new organization, founded some four months ago, called the Club for International Relations. Its members are made up of people from many different countries who are in Paris or who come there frequently and who cover many different fields of endeavor.

The meeting was opened by Francois Ollive, a very brilliant chemist who had asked me before the meeting if I would have time to come and visit his factory which is organized on new lines and of which he is very proud. He seems to be a great admirer of the U.S. and speaks most kindly of all we have done and of the need for cooperation between our countries.

There followed a really extraordinarily interesting speech by Dr. Leon Binet on medical and surgical cooperation and the development which had come about in the world because of this cooperation. This famous doctor is much interested in the International Children's Emergency Fund Center, which developed the innoculations for tuberculosis, which have saved so many children in Europe.

After this meeting I attended the reception given by the delegates of Saudi Arabia in honor of their king's birthday.

My husband remarked more than once, after his visit with the king on board his ship, that the king insisted that he had always been a warrior and that he always would be one. The other interests which Franklin suggested to him were interests that could be taken up with his sons or his brothers, but, said my husband, "He is a grand old man."

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL