My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Thursday—It makes one sad to read the story of the bomb-killing of Harry T. Moore, the state coordinator for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.

That is the kind of violent incident that will be spread all over every country in the world and the harm it will do us among the people of the world is untold.

Very few people know about a pamphlet written by an American Communist called, "We Charge Genocide," but it was brought to the General Assembly of the United Nations and very widely distributed there. The Communists have not used it in an argument as yet, because they probably know it could be successfully answered. But they undoubtedly inspired the writing of it and the idea of taking it to the United Nations so that when it is widely distributed here among the Negro people it will have the status of a petition against the United States.

Our Negro citizens will know this and will feel that everything that appears in it must be true. It will do great harm at home because the answers to untruths and half-truths are always less dramatic than the assertions. It is the kind of incident such as occurred Christmas night in Florida that will give seeming verification to the things that are said in this pamphlet.

I grieve for this dead man and his widow, who were trying to do the right thing as they saw it for their people who are citizens of the United States. Whether you agree with what they did or not, they should have been protected against any violence of this kind.

I am glad to see such a hearty response to the popular fund-raising for the ransom of the American aviators held in Hungary. It showed the determination of the American people to help in any way they could. But I am not quite sure that the State Department did the right thing in giving in and paying any ransom at all. These men were being held illegally, and we say they were not guilty of the offense. Why then should a ransom be paid? It is going to make it almost impossible for anyone to go inside any of these countries because on one pretext or another the authorities can find ways to imprison anyone and hold him for ransom.

I was amused by one of my fellow columnists (a lady) the other day talking out against the assertion that "she thinks like a man."

I have always disliked that phrase heartily because I could never see the use in a woman thinking or acting like a man. Men and women have always complemented each other; they do not need to imitate each other.

My fellow columnist, however, seems to imply that women should have done more than they have about ethics and morals in politics and business. Politics has become at least connected with Big Business and one has to bracket them together and I agree that women could do some things to help clean up the present situation in both. Probably one of the first things would be to use our feminine shrewdness about accepting gifts from the gentlemen.

Too many women are inclined to think that certain gifts are given without any ulterior motive and they always imply something of that sort but if your husband's business associates are particularly kind to the "little wife" you may be quite sure that your husband is going to be made to pay in one way or another. If you are somebody's secretary it isn't just for your good looks that you are being taken to dinner and offered opportunities to obtain things at special prices, etc. Sometime or other you are going to be asked to do a favor—and one perhaps that you will find very unpalatable.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL