My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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PARIS, Monday—I think most people who hoped that some agreement would mean an immediate armistice and cease-fire in Korea have felt a little let down as they realized that until the armistice is actually signed, and all agreements are made, there will be no cease-fire. We all want so much to feel that precious human lives are saved that it makes us very impatient to wait while final arrangements are made. But our leaders on the spot probably feel that in the long run it will save more time and more lives if we do wait now and get everything properly arranged.

I went to a press conference in the United Nations Building here the other day to explain the United States position and the situation as it exists on the Human Rights covenant, which we have started to discuss in Committee Three.

I also found myself asked to explain our abstention on the resolution urging all nations to contribute to UNICEF. A great many delegates voted in favor of this resolution though they stated that their countries had not as yet committed themselves to any contribution this year. I abstained because I felt it was more honest not to mislead my fellow delegates by voting for a resolution when I have been told by our two Congressional members of the delegation that even though the President has made a request for a contribution and the Senate has acquiesced there is probably no chance, in their opinion, of getting the House committee to appropriate any money.

Since appropriations have to come from the House, I thought the U.N. should not be misled by a vote on my part. Should any money be appropriated in the future it will be a very pleasant surprise to all of us who feel that two of the things we wanted have been at last accomplished.

Long-range projects looking to increased production are now almost universally being undertaken by the Children's Emergency Fund, and the specialized agencies are being consulted before projects are decided upon, not afterwards. Nevertheless the fund is still an "emergency" one, though it is doing a job that is vitally necessary—a continuing job for the welfare of children. The administrative expenses are not being borne by all the members of the U.N., as we hoped might be the case. I think this might be brought about, however, when the setup comes up for reconsideration two years from now, if the fund is able to go on functioning without contributions from the United States. At that time I would be glad if we could hope for a change in the attitude of the House committee.

I lunched on Friday with Admiral Alan G. and Mrs. Kirk to meet Mr. and Mrs. Norman Armour, our Ambassador to Belgium and his wife, and one or two Belgian guests.

In the evening I went to a French charity sale for the benefit of unfortunate children and then spent a little while with Mrs. Warren Austin before dinner. I am glad to say that Ambassador Austin seems better. So many on the delegation have suffered from colds, which seem to bring with them some fever and a good deal of discomfort, that I feel sorry for the men who have to argue and listen to endless speeches when they really should be home in bed!

It takes a little time to become accustomed to a different climate and different food, but I hope we will not have any more temporary casualties either in our delegation or in any of the others.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL