My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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PARIS, Monday—There is a group of people in Brussels which has at one time or another been in Nazi concentration camps and which now has organized to speak out against the type of cruel procedure practiced under Hitler in such camps. Known as the International Commission against "Le Regime Concentrationnaire" these people are trying to investigate and ascertain the truth about concentration camps everywhere in the world.

They have held hearings and have heard witnesses who have been in concentration camps. They have gotten out two publications and are about to publish a third book on this subject, and they have planned to put out more of their materials if money is available.

There is much more authentic information of this kind in Europe than I had thought existed, and I think these publications would be of great interest to many in the United States.

I sometimes think the groups in the United States that have advocated world government must take some satisfaction in the trend that is clearly developing in the United Nations and which means a steady growth of power in the General Assembly.

This body is become a 60-nation parliament, and the smaller nations have the same opportunity to be heard and to carry weight as have the big members.

The world government groups have wanted the peoples of the world to be heard. They may feel that the contact is not yet complete enough but if you believe in a representative form of government there are many nations among the 60 that make up the U.N. where the democratic process of representation is certainly carried out. There are a considerable number of nations that perhaps never gave much thought to this democratic process which are coming here now and really trying to bring before the peoples of the world the needs and problems of their people in a truly representative fashion.

I left Paris Friday afternoon and flew to Amsterdam. There I attended a meeting called under the auspices of Queen Juliana of the Netherlands.

I think I should devote a whole column to telling you about the idea of this meeting, so I will finish today with a few frivolous remarks on the fashions as they strike me after the first weeks in Paris.

The best-dressed women I have seen, and perhaps almost the prettiest I have seen, are the young French and Latin American women. I happened to be with a group the other night, all of whom were young and beautiful and dressed the latest fashion.

One sees more bare shoulders and strapless dresses here in the evening. Two young girls I saw dressed in white, spangled tulle skirts that stood out, with tight embroidered white satin bodices, might have walked out of a picture by a French artist and were lovely to look at.

The smartest hats I have seen are small and simple, usually with only one point of decoration but worn at a becoming angle. There is no fashion about the angle and you have to decide for yourself which way you will wear your newly bought Paris hat.

Gloves are really a joy, soft and pliable and well made.

Prices are high for everything and I think the French women do a great deal of looking before they buy at any of the showings to which all of us are warmly invited. Unfortunately, I have not had the time to go to any as yet.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL