My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Thursday —When I came back to New York City on Wednesday I was interested in seeing in the evening paper that the U.N. record proved that Ambassador Jessup was not at a White House conference on February 5, 1949. He was in New York City on that day. It doesn't seem to me very important anyway, because I think this controversy between Mr. Stassen and Mr. Jessup should never have been blown up to anything approximating formal accusations on both sides. Records seem to be good things to have about, under certain circumstances, however.

Finally, the appointment of Chester A. Bowles to be Ambassador to India was confirmed by the Senate. Apparently, the vote on this question, which should never have been a partisan question in any way, was a purely partisan vote.

The one Democrat, whom one might expect to vote against another Democrat of a slightly different type and who did vote against Mr. Bowles and has announced that he will vote against Mr. Jessup, is, of course, Senator Pat McCarran. I sometimes wonder whether he ever lies awake at night figuring out whether the bill on immigration which he sponsored has always worked out exactly as he intended it should. From what I hear, occasionally it has caused a good many heartaches to many people who really don't deserve the anguish.

I have not yet said a word of greeting to Her Royal Highness, Princess Elizabeth, and the Duke of Edinburgh. These two young people are a very charming couple and deserve the warm welcome which Canada is giving them.

Princess Elizabeth has always shown a very deep sense of responsibility to her many duties, but she is also young and able to enjoy new experiences and all of us will wish her a very happy time in Canada and a warm welcome and a happy time when she comes to the United States.

This is the time of year when most women's clubs make plans for cultural lectures during the coming season, and a circular I recently received has excited my interest. It says that Mrs. Herman de Wetter of Westfield, New Jersey, who has lived for 15 years in many foreign countries and has lectured in many states in our own country, is available to speak on a number of subjects. And these subjects include: "The Art of Being a Mother-in-Law."

I never thought of it before as an art, but I think this is a delightful idea. I am sure that anyone who would give a lecture such a title would make the lecture both amusing and useful.

Then there is a subject called, "Philosophy for Seniors." A good many of us have become seniors little by little over the years and as we become seniors we have to adjust to new ways of living. We may have to learn to live with more people than we lived with before, or we may have to live with far fewer. In any case, it does require adjustment and is worthy of a lecture.

Finally, there is one called, "Russia and the Revolution." Mrs. de Wetter speaks Russian, lived for two years in that vast country, and certainly seems qualified to talk about it.

These lectures sound interesting to me and so I pass the story along to you. I wish that I was going to have the time to attend a whole series of such lectures.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL