My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Tuesday—I think I have already mentioned in this column the resignation of Katharine Lenroot as Chief of our Children's Bureau. I was very happy to be invited to a dinner held in her honor at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington on Wednesday of this week.

My contacts with Miss Lenroot were many while she was the head of the Children's Bureau, by appointment from my husband in 1934. Both my husband and I had great interest in all the work undertaken in this country for children.

In addition, I have, of course, come in contact with Miss Lenroot in various undertakings for children in connection with other parts of the world, such as the foster care arranged for British children in World War II, and much of the work that Miss Lenroot has done in the United Nations concerning the Children's Emergency Fund.

I am looking forward to being at the dinner and I think it will be like old home week. We will not only be paying tribute to Miss Lenroot but we will be welcoming Dr. Martha Eliot, who is the new Chief of the Bureau.

My friend of many years, Frances Perkins, who is now a Civil Service commissioner and was the Secretary of Labor in my husband's Administrations, will preside at the dinner and I know how well she handles such a role. I am sure that other speakers will turn out to be old friends and that we will all enjoy this opportunity to meet together and pay tribute to Miss Lenroot's long and successful service.

On October 16 at the Serigraph Galleries, here, there will open a comprehensive exhibition of all the graphic arts in black and white and in color by the best known Norwegian artists. This is a goodwill gesture to introduce the Norwegian artists to the United States and at the same time the exhibition will show our appreciation of the wonderful welcome given to American artists for an exhibition in Scandinavia.

The Scandinavian official agencies are sponsoring this international art show since they feel it will have a beneficial effect on the cultural relations between the United States and Norway. Part of the proceeds from admissions will go to the Norwegian artists' fund, which is administered by the government. This is a real opportunity for many of us to acquaint ourselves with a very fine collection brought over by Edward Landon, who was in Norway last year on a Fulbright grant. I hope the exhibition will be well patronized.

I think we, the people, are fighting the British election in advance in some of our newspapers. The Gallup Poll, which appeared in one of our papers a day or so ago, giving some of the reasons why the Labor government is in trouble, might be taken to heart by some of our high officials in this country.

The release starts right off: "Enemy No. 1 of the British Labor government, fighting for re-election October 25 against heavy odds, is the rising cost of living. It accounts almost entirely for the pronounced swing to the Conservative party of Winston Churchill."

Hadn't some of our important leaders better watch out for American living costs?

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL