My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Thursday—Tuesday morning I went by plane to Buffalo to speak at the convention of the International Union of Electrical, Radio and Machine Workers. I arrived in time to lunch with James B. Carey and some of the other gentlemen and then went to the afternoon session, which was televised.

The union seems to have adopted as its slogan: "What is good for us must also be good for the country as a whole." That strikes me as being a good guide for every industrialist and government official in this country. Groups must learn to think not in terms of their own interests alone, but in terms of the general welfare and how the development of their own interests can be made to fit into the picture so that their own interests will be a part of the well-being of the country.

The next step, of course, is to plan for international welfare and tie our own domestic plans into the general welfare of the world.

This requires thinking on a very magnificent scale, but we are famous for our ability not only to dream dreams but to carry them out to practical reality.

I think we could get the backing of our own country if we could just paint a picture of the needs of the world and how they could be met. Then we could actually take the initiative away from the Soviet Union, for this is an action for peace, not just promises for it.

I would like to see a group set up among us to make this plan and then tell us what we have to do to carry it out and tell the rest of the world what their obligation is. At least, it would prove to the world that we do not want war and that we have plans for peaceful development and that every nation, including Russia, has a place in our plan.

On Wednesday afternoon Dr. Alberto Gainza Paz, the exiled editor and publisher of the Buenos Aires, Argentina, La Prensa, came to see me. And he brought with him his wife, his mother and his sister-in-law.

They were most delightful guests and I was so glad to have this opportunity to tell Dr. Paz how much I hoped the day would come when his paper would again be under his guidance.

Dr. Paz's mother, whose home is in Uruguay, had, like so many other Latin American women, always gone to Europe for vacations and this was her first visit to the United States. She seemed pleased with the country as she has seen it so far, and I hope before the party leaves for South America that they all will come to Hyde Park and lunch with me.

In another week or so the drive up the parkway to Hyde Park from New York should be a riot of color. Our autumns are always the best show that we can offer visitors from almost any part of the world.

Most of my day on Wednesday was spent seeing people—all of whom had some special interest. One man in particular wants the opportunity to do psychiatric study on human relations, which might have, he believes, far-reaching effects on people all over the world.

I find it very difficult to evaluate what one can do to help people and what one cannot do simply because one knows nothing about the subject brought in for consideration.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL