My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Friday—I came down here early Thursday with my granddaughter, Sistie, and my small great-grandson so that she might do a few last-minute errands, see her brother and sister-in-law, and go to the theatre once before she and her husband and baby sail for Paris. Neither of them speaks French fluently so they are going to have to devote themselves to that study before they can enjoy the theatre in Paris. Fortunately, however, music speaks to the heart and they are both fond of music, so they can enjoy that even if they have a little difficulty with the language.

Speaking of music, I am happy to find that in our community there is an increasing interest in concerts and in musical education. The Hudson Valley Chamber Music Circle at Staatsburgh in Dutchess County here gives a series of concerts for their subscribers in the old Ogden Mills house which now belongs to New York State and is run by the Taconic State Park Commission. I intended to go this Saturday night, but there is also a Democratic meeting in the town of Hyde Park, so I think I shall have to get two of my grandchildren to enjoy the music while I listen to what the politicians have to say locally.

I was also asked to buy tickets for a children's concert series to be given in the county this autumn and winter, which I think is particularly encouraging. I believe it important for children to begin early to enjoy music. Unfortunately for me, I will be away so much this year that I am not going to be able to attend with any of my grandchildren.

The other day I received two issues of a small publication called "Heart Beat." This is issued for people who are suffering with heart disease and need to be encouraged by knowing what other people with the same handicap are doing with their lives.

What interests me most is the number of cardiacs. However, once they accept the fact that they must live with their illness, they manage to develop not only many hobbies and interests which they did not have before but they also find new ways to make a living. Some of them developed from skills acquired in working on their hobbies.

One family in the Bensonhurst section of Brooklyn, N.Y., has built up a business, making and selling crepe-paper flowers. It was something the mother of the family had done as a hobby, but now it gives her husband, with her help, a way to earn a living. I hope that those who would be encouraged by reading this magazine will subscribe. It will pay dividends in information and encouragement.

Now comes a request to say a word about a new game designed to be fun and at the same time teach us something about world issues and things that are going on around us. It is called "Boom" and has been praised by many of our best magazines. I haven't played it myself, but I couldn't resist mentioning it to you because Mr. Sewell Smith of Lafayette, California, and his wife consider this their hobby. It is a nonprofit hobby which they hope to promote, giving any profits that accrue to agencies working for world peace. If it will help peace, I am sure we will all play it every day in the week.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL