My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Monday—Occasionally planes do unusual things, or rather the weather does funny things, and the weather in the Northwest delayed the young family whom I was going to meet at LaGuardia Field on Thursday night. We went on Friday instead when they arrived safe and happy.

The young parents started out at once on a shopping expedition, leaving the baby to sleep after his rather disturbed night. In the afternoon of Friday, we came up to Hyde Park and on Saturday morning I took them to visit some of our old friends here who had not seen Sistie for seven years and had never met her husband and baby.

Saturday was such a beautiful day I kept wishing some of this good weather had been with us over the Labor Day weekend. So many people would have enjoyed their long-planned holiday much more if the weather hadn't been so rainy.

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Our Hyde Park High School is offering adult education courses this year, and while I was buying fruit and vegetables Saturday morning, one of the ladies who was also doing her weekend shopping told me they were drawing on professors from Bard College and Vassar as well as from the Franklin D. Roosevelt Library. She also told me there will be courses in citizenship, history and economics. We are rich in sources from which to draw on specialists in this area, and I am delighted to know that our schools are beginning to make use of these sources.

City College in New York City is doing something interesting, too, this year. It is combining courses for adults in the afternoon, which are given in a central location, and at the same time, in the same building, the school is holding classes in arts and crafts for the children of the parents who are attending the adult classes. This seems to be a great opportunity for young mothers to develop some of their own interests and to have their children constructively occupied at the same time.

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September is going to be marked by many activities in our area, but I think one of the most constructive is the plan of the Committee for American Relief for Korea to collect clothes during this month for the destitute people of Korea. Last winter cold and exposure wiped out three million innocent Koreans, many of whom at the time had little but rags left.

Douglas Fairbanks is chairman of this committee, and President Truman has issued a proclamation to make us more conscious of our responsibility. So, if you have warm clothing, or even such things as overalls and underclothes, or blankets or bedding of any kind, dig them out of your attic or storage and send them to American Relief for Korea. The parcels must be prepaid and the address in the east is Maspeth, Long Island, New York, and in the west Oakland, California. From these centers it is shipped by Army transport to Korea.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL