My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Thursday—Tomorrow I will write about some more important questions. But just for today I feel like forgetting that uncertainty hangs over us throughout the world, and sharing with you some of the little things that make for security in spite of world-shaking events.

Yesterday I spent a few hours in New York City. My niece, her two small boys and I left Hyde Park by car at 7:30 in the morning. I had two people to see—one at 10 and one at 10:45—and a recording to do for the Crusade for Freedom.

One of these days I want to tell you more about that crusade because in the month of September you will be asked to become a part of it. I hope everyone will respond since it is the one nongovernmental activity that I think is doing a tremendous amount in opposition to communism.

While I was doing these odds and ends, and signing a little mail and seeing our New York City secretary, Miss Maureen Corr, who is just back from her vacation looking brown and well, my niece was taking her two little boys sightseeing.

First they went to the top of the Empire State Building and what a thrill they had! Looking down from that height they could see for themselves that Manhattan really is an island. We had tried to explain that fact on the way in to the city, but it had made no real dent. Then they ate at the little Finnish Restaurant on 50th Street, which I think is one of the most attractive and quiet spots in town.

After that the youngest boy said they "saw everything" in the American Museum of Natural History. I question that statement. But they brought back postcards of all the animals there, and I am quite sure they did see a great deal.

I lunched with Mr. John Golden, and he promised to have my youngest granddaughter, age four, who is in town now, to lunch with him. She likes gentlemen very much and I am sure she will put herself out to win him the first 10 minutes of their acquaintance. I have always found that she rises to an occasion. The other day when we were having quite a big picnic, I asked her if she would take a young couple who had just arrived into my house and show them where they could leave their things. They told me later she not only did that, but she carefully showed them all over the house!

One of the things I can always count on is a warm welcome from the Scotties when I get home. We have a Scottie visitor just now because my son, Elliott's family is away in Colorado for two weeks and their little Scottie has come to stay with us. She prefers her own family, but accepts our attentions politely. Fala and Tamas, however, greet me with joy, and forgive the fact that I have been gone all day.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, NHyP