My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Tuesday—It was good to read yesterday that the Chinese Communists acknowledged their mistake in allowing armed troops in a neutral zone. The truce talks are our only hope of a real understanding, and it is to be hoped that the Reds also will see that it is wise to have the buffer zone established where the troops now are. The 38th Parallel demarcation was chosen in a hurried and haphazard manner and really should be left out completely from the present discussion. The hope for all Koreans is that someday they will be one united nation. Therefore, to have a buffer zone where the troops now stand would seem to make sense.

It would certainly give more security to the South Koreans to know that the 38th Parallel was not considered of such importance that it had to continue to be the line separating North and South Korea.

There has been considerable talk lately about the rift between the leadership of Communist China and the leadership of the Soviet Union. It makes sense, I think, to believe that the major objective of all Asiatics is to gain recognition among the peoples of the world on a par with all the other great nations of the world, and it is not surprising that they wish to play a major part in settling Asiatic questions.

White peoples have long exploited the Asiatic nations. While in the old days there may have been a feeling that it was the duty of the white races to spread their kind of civilization and that they were conferring a benefit in so doing—which gave them an excuse to feel they had a right to reap certain economic returns—still it is pretty generally conceded today that the Asiatics have a right to clear up their own affairs in their own way. And though for a time this may mean dictatorship, it is probable that where there are such great populations the people will make themselves heard and take a part in their governments. Certainly we, in the democracies, must applaud that desire and believe that whether people are yellow, or black, or brown, they are capable of developing their resources.

Therefore, their wishes should be paramount.

It is interesting to see in the newspaper that for the first time during the past 10 years more people moved out of New York City than moved into it. There was an increase in population in the city, however, and this has been due to the fact that after the war there was a tremendous increase in the number of births.

A large number of those coming into the city were Puerto Ricans. Also, some displaced people moved in, as well as Negroes from the South and a few whites from other sections of the country. The encouraging thing from my point of view is that those moving out of the city moved to less populated but nearby areas, which would indicate they are still working in the city but realized the advantages of living where there is a little more air to breathe and a better play space for the children. I hope this will continue. Cities of the size of New York should be limited.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL